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In Transit Blog: A Geneva Hotel Thinks Younger

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 18 April 2014 | 17.35

Some travelers will go to any length for the type of rest and relaxation that makes them feel 10 years younger.

But for those with limited time to do so, a new program from La Réserve Genève Hotel and Spa in Switzerland promises a rejuvenating experience in seven days or less.

La Réserve, which describes itself as a "cleverly concealed reserve of happiness" on Lake Geneva, is now offering a new spa program developed and supervised by Nescens, a company that specializes in anti-aging products and programs, designed with the help of specialists at Genolier, one of Switzerland's largest networks of medical clinics.

The four- or seven-day programs begin with a full medical assessment, including a blood test and other queries into diet, lifestyle and exercise.

The result is a custom treatment program for each guest, created and supervised by a Nescens team, including osteopaths, dieticians, doctors to advise on anti-aging medications, and fitness and lifestyle coaches.

Next comes the best part: the actual treatments, which can include massages, body contouring (a massage performed by an osteopath that focuses on knees, ankles and shoulders), therapeutic baths, wraps, scrubs and three organic meals a day.

Most treatments take place in the spa's 22,000-square-foot facility and are available to locals and hotel guests at a price of 3,200 Swiss francs  (about $3,750) for the four-day program and 4,900 francs ($5,740) for seven days, not including accommodations. Average room rates at the hotel start at 445 francs ($520), double occupancy.

Extra days can be added for those who might want to try to erase a bit more of their past.


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T Magazine: Feeling For | A Bohemian Getaway in the Heart of Mumbai

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 17 April 2014 | 17.35

Until this year, Mumbai didn't have a single boutique hotel. There was the Taj Palace, with its iconic confectionary grandeur; some characterless, midrange hotels scattered around Colaba, the core of historic South Mumbai; the Oberoi and the Trident in their 1970s concrete boxes. But there was no hotel that captured both the rich visual heritage of historic Bombay and the intense aesthetic energy of contemporary Mumbai. Now, there's Abode.

Built by David Sassoon, a wealthy entrepreneur, at the turn of the 20th century, the building was run as a small hotel for decades by the Sham family. In 2011, the English expatriate Lizzie Chapman approached Abedin Sham, the family's patriarch, about transforming the space into a stylish, affordable city retreat. Shortly after, the pair brought on the Australian architect and designer Sian Pascale to modernize the interiors while conserving the building's bones.

Abode was designed with a diverse audience of travelers in mind. The ground floor boasts luxury rooms outfitted with two-story windows, separate sitting areas and restored midcentury furniture alongside original local artworks. Upstairs, the basic rooms — though smaller and set up with shared toilets — combine the price point of a hostel (spots start at just 3500 rupees per night) with a heavy dose of Pascale's bohemian design sensibility and attention to detail.

From the outset, Chapman hoped to eschew the obsequious formality of India's celebrated palace hotels – what Chapman describes as "Sir/Madam/Namaste service" – in favor of something truer to the city's casual, offhand warmth. Pascale, for her part, based her design on Bombay's singular aesthetic history, upending typical notions of Indian luxury. To that end, you won't find turbans or cusped arches here. Instead, you'll see traditionally patterned cement tiles and Art Deco teakwood furniture, sourced from the city's markets (the Sham family has a long history in antique dealing). Old books in Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati and English line the walls, which are dotted with signs handcrafted by the same artisans who paint buses and trucks across town.

Throughout, there are glimpses of Mumbai's precolonial fishing villages, its Raj-era Victoriana, its midcentury boom and its frenetic, irrepressible present. Two clocks in the reception area, set to the same time, are cleverly labeled "Bombay" and "Mumbai," a nod to the city's simultaneous propensity toward nostalgia and tendency to ruthlessly demolish its own past. Here, a list of must-see/do/eat items for your next trip to the most populous city in India.

Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Museum
The city's most celebrated restoration project transformed the former Victoria & Albert Museum into a lovely display of urban history and craft. Set in the once affluent neighborhood of Byculla, adjacent to the Mumbai Zoo, the BDL Museum is a wonderfully atmospheric departure from the tested tourist grounds of Colaba and Fort.
91 A, Rani Baug, Veer Mata Jijbai Bhonsle Udyan, Dr Baba Saheb Ambedkar Marg, Byculla East, Mumbai; bdlmuseum.org.

Liberty Cinema
Mumbai's best Art Deco showpiece is, appropriately in this city of cinema, a movie theater. Recently restored to its original glory, it's possibly the world's best place to watch a film.
Liberty Building, Vitthaldas Thackersey Marg, Dhobi Talao, New Marine Lines, Marine Lines, Mumbai; thelibertycinema.com.

Britannia restaurant
The Parsis, the Zoroastrian community with its roots in Iran, may be a minority in Mumbai, but they have had an outsize impact on the city's cultural growth over the centuries. For sampling the community's unique culinary traditions, there's no institution more iconic than Britannia. Don't miss the berry pulao (a rice dish prepared with dried berries and meat) or the sali boti (mutton stewed with onions and tomatoes and topped with crispy fried onions) — or an opportunity to chat with the venerable bespectacled owner, who will, upon learning that you're American, tell you exactly how much he loves "Madam Hillary Clinton."
Wakefield House, 16 Ballard Estate, 11, Sprott Rd, Ballard Estate, Fort, Mumbai; +91 022-2261-5264.

The best seafood spots
Most Americans don't think of fish when they imagine Indian cuisine, but like any coastal city, Mumbai relishes its seafood. There are plenty of options here, many of them quite famous. You'll undoubtedly hear about Trishna and Mahesh Lunch Home, but of the seafood institutions dotting south Mumbai, the real gems are New Martin, a bare bones canteen serving traditional Goan cooking, and Ankur, serving Mangalorean food from the coast south of Goa in comfy, if kitschy, surroundings.
New Martin, 21 Glamour House, Strand Road, near Radio Club. Ankur, MP Shetty Marg, near Horniman Circle, Fort; +91 022-2265-4194.

Shree Thakker Bhojanalay
Along with the Parsis, Gujaratis are Mumbai's most influential community of merchants. Vegetarian Gujarati cuisine often gets left off foodie itineraries, but the thali, or unlimited set lunch, at Thakker's, a 70-year-old restaurant tucked away in the rundown bazaar of Kalbadevi, is among the greatest culinary surprises the city has to offer.
31 Dadiseth Agiary Lane, 2nd floor, Kalbadevi; +91 022-2201-1232.

The bazaars
North of the old British districts of Fort and Colaba, you'll reach the bustling bazaars of what was once known as the Native Town. There's the shabby Victorian tower of Crawford Market, the densely packed lanes of the Mangaldas Fabric Market in the elaborately pinnacled shadow of the Jama Masjid and past that, Zaveri Bazaar, famous for its costume jewelry.

Mohammed Ali Road
Chor Bazaar (which means "The Thieves Market") is Mumbai's antiques lane, and one of its most popular attractions. This is the place to buy old photos and Bollywood Posters (and, of course, to bargain). The adjacent Mohammed Ali Road is also the best place to try the cuisines of the city's Muslim populations. The nalli nihari – a delectable beef stew topped with bone marrow – at Noor Mohammadi is a highlight.
Noor Mohammadi, 181-183 Abdul Hakim Noor Mohammadi Chowk, Bhendi Bazaar.

South Mumbai shopping
Several of Mumbai's best boutiques are clustered within easy reach of Abode. Bombay Electric is known for its eclectic collections from young local designers. Bungalow 8, a three-story monument to local design, contains a stunning collection of furniture, accessories and one of the city's best loved clothing labels, The Bungalow. And Obataimu, just north of Colaba in the gallery district of Kala Ghoda, combines a global aesthetic with India's special talent for personalized tailoring.
Bombay Electric, 1 Reay House, Best Marg, Colaba. Bungalow 8, Grants Building, Apollo Bunder Rd, near Radio Club. Obataimu, Machinery House, B Bharucha Marg, Kala Ghoda.

Bandra
The so-called "Queen of the Suburbs" is now home to much of the city's young creative class. It's one of the best parts of town for a stroll along tree-lined streets, up seaside promenades and past colonial-era bungalows. This is the place to take the city's pulse and see that New India you've heard so much about.

Related: The Scene | When in India


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In Transit Blog: New Tours of Johnson’s Glass House

Starting in May, visitors to architect Philip Johnson's renowned Glass House in New Canaan, Conn., will have a twice-monthly option of taking a self-guided tour, allowing them to linger in the house and at several other Johnson-designed buildings on the 49-acre grounds.

Glass House guides will be on hand to provide background and answer questions.

A variety of guided tours also is available when the grounds are open, from May 1 to Nov. 30.

Visitors this year also will be treated to "Veil," an installation by the Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya, where a shroud of mist will periodically enclose the house and then gradually disappear to reveal the landscape.

The self-guided tours and installation are part of an initiative by the new director Henry Urbach to enliven Glass House visits through readings, performances, sleep-overs, art exhibitions and other offerings, spokeswoman Christa Carr said in an email.

Philip Johnson, the founding director of the department of architecture at the Museum of Modern Art, helped define modern architecture in America. His all-glass, one-room house, built from 1949 to 1955 as a weekend retreat, pioneered the use of materials such as glass and steel in home design.

The landscape completely surrounds the house, which is situated at the edge of a crest overlooking a pond. Johnson turned the house over to the National Trust before his death in 2005, and it was opened to the public in 2007. Tours depart by shuttle from the visitor center in downtown New Canaan. Prices range from $30 to $250 a person; the self-guided option is $75.


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In Transit Blog: A Scottish Trail Will Celebrate John Muir

To celebrate the spirit, work and legacy of the  conservationist John Muir, Scotland will officially unveil the John Muir Way on April 21.

The 134-mile marked trail starts at his birthplace in Dunbar and concludes at Helensburgh, where he embarked on his journey to the United States.

Flanked by gleaming lakes and hills, the trail features well-known landmarks including Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh; the Trossachs (Scotland's first national park); and Muir's Birthplace Museum.

The trail takes roughly 12 days to walk and a few days to bike, but it can be done in shorter sections.

Several historic castles lie en route as does Antonine's Wall, a stone and turf fortification built by the Romans in A.D. 142 in the Central Belt of Scotland, and now a World Heritage site.

Two newly constructed horse-head figures — the Kelpies, the largest equine sculptures in the world — can be viewed at Falkirk. Created by the artist Andy Scott, the 100-foot, 300-ton sculptures are a tribute to Celtic mythology and inspired by Scotland's history of working Clydesdale horses.

"Muir changed the way people thought about protecting nature," said Michael McCuish, international public relations executive for VisitScotland. "The John Muir Way is composed of a lot of little trails that form a continuous walkway: It is the same bicoastal journey he took as a child."

In the United States, Muir founded the Sierra Club and became an energetic champion of national parks.

The trail is part of Visit Scotland's Year of Homecoming celebrations; 2014 marks the centennial of Muir's death. The John Muir Way Festival, filled with events along the trail through April 26, acts as a prelude to the official opening.


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T Magazine: Travel Diary | Jasmin Shokrian Dives Into the Burgeoning Dallas Art Scene

The Los Angeles-based designer Jasmin Shokrian makes quietly striking, sculptural clothes beloved by women in the art world. During last week's Dallas Art Fair, the owners of Tenoversix — the L.A. boutique that last year opened an outpost in (and served as a design consultancy for) Dallas's art-filled Joule Hotel — invited Shokrian to hold a trunk show in their space. The event offered an ideal excuse for Shokrian to explore the metropolis and its booming cultural scene over the weekend. "It felt like kind of a magical city," she says. Yes, she's talking about Dallas. Here, she shares some highlights, including a joint exhibition by Julian Schnabel and Richard Phillips at Dallas Contemporary and an accompanying dinner, a spin through the fair, a gallery opening co-hosted by the model and Dallas native Erin Wasson and a party called the Eye Ball.

DAY ONE

"I arrived at the wonderful Joule Hotel, where I was welcomed by Kristen Lee, owner of Tenoversix. The lobby was beautifully done and the artwork, from the collection of the Joule's owner Tim Headington, was really impressive. The first order of business was the trunk show for my collection at Tenoversix. The event included a visit from the New York nail artists Vanity Projects. I am not usually a fan of nail art, but they created some really amazing designs inspired by artists like Yayoi Kusama and John Baldessari, so I stepped out of my comfort zone and got half-moons inspired by my collection. My "Je Pars Habiter A Los Angeles" T-shirt continued to be popular. I think people respond to it because it's a comment about imagined utopias, this idea that you always want to live somewhere else. Maybe Dallas should be the next city …

As soon as it was over, we had to rush to change for a dinner at the hotel in celebration of Julian Schnabel and Richard Phillips's joint opening at Dallas Contemporary. Dinner was lovely, and we were in great company."

DAY TWO

"We toured the Dallas Art Fair. It was exciting. It feels like Dallas is culturally having a moment. The ceramic pieces by Nicole Cherubini were beautiful. I had never seen her work before. I also liked works by the Berlin-based artist James Krone and the L.A. artists Jen Guidi and Paul Cowan and an installation by Scott Reeder. After a stop at the Nasher Sculpture Center, we went to the opening of the Schnabel/Phillips show at Dallas Contemporary. The scale of the space and the paintings was very impressive. Richard Phillips's film made in conjunction with his Lindsay Lohan paintings gave the work a depth I hadn't experienced before."

DAY THREE

"I was in need of some R&R at this point, and I was lucky to arrange an amazing 80-minute deep tissue massage at the Espa spa at the Joule. Even the spa was filled with great art — there were sculptures and wall pieces by Anthony Pearson everywhere! Later, we went to the great Forty Five Ten for an event Erin Wasson — a Dallas native — hosted for Régime des Fleurs, a new fragrance company from my friends Alia Raza and Ezra Woods. Next there was the Eye Ball — a gala held in the sculpture garden across the street from the Joule that's co-hosted by the Nasher. The eyeball by Tony Tasset is 30 feet tall and made of glass, resin and steel. Then we went to a show at That That, a gallery, curated by David Quadrini and co-hosted again by Erin. A really amazing little installation that I loved was by John Riepenhoff, called the John Riepenhoff Experience. You climbed up a ladder to stick your head in a hole and view tiny paintings that Scott Reeder made — they're reproductions of his own large paintings. That photo is of a tiny little skylight in a tiny little gallery! It was very John Malkovich."


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In Transit Blog: When Boating With Young Children

Written By wartini cantika on Rabu, 16 April 2014 | 17.36

Still want to take your children out onto the open sea? You've got company.

The failed sailing trip across the Pacific Ocean by the Kaufman family  — the parents Charlotte and Eric and their daughters, Cora, 3, and Lyra, 1 — has prompted a vigorous debate about the wisdom of embarking on such a voyage with young children that has continued even after the  United States Navy warship that helped rescue them arrived in San Diego on Wednesday.

While many parents, including experienced sailors, have questioned whether infants and toddlers should be involved in such a trip (Lyra had developed a fever, a rash and diarrhea, and the boat was adrift), there is a small but thriving community of travelers who insist that there is a safe way to embark on an off-the-grid family voyage by sea, and that the benefits far outweigh the risks.

The age of children and preparation for the endeavor are significant factors. But each family has its own standards.

Cindy Wallach, a writer, and her husband, Doug Vibbert, have lived on a sailboat since 1998 and cruised from Annapolis, Md.,  to the Caribbean until they had their children, Zach, now 9, and Naia, 3. Although both children have lived aboard since they were born and often sail the Chesapeake Bay with their parents on two- to seven-day excursions, the couple is waiting until the children are a bit older before taking them on any longer passages.

"They're not ready yet, we're still saving up money, getting the boat ready," Ms. Wallach said. "There are a lot of logistics to it." Our to-do list is now twice as long because we know what we're getting into. So we're taking our time."

A great resource, she said, is the tight-knit  "tribe" of sailing families around the world who are chatting online nightly through email, Skype and instant messaging and sharing their stories and experiences through blogs and forums.  "We hash things over and help each other out," she said. (There are numerous resources for cruising safely with children, including Womenandcruising.com and Cruisingworld.com, both of which have forums.) Most families take anywhere from six months to two years to prepare before crossing an ocean, practicing with coastal hops and building up to overnight trips.  "You see what breaks, you see what you can handle," Ms. Wallach said.

Water safety rules are  a big part of their daily life, as they have always lived aboard. The children wear personal flotation devices when on the deck of the boat or on the dock and know what to do in a man-overboard situation.  "My daughter can be running full speed in the grass around the marina, and she will stop cold and sit down and wait for me at the beginning of the dock," Ms. Wallach said.

And the family is very serious about swimming.  "We joke that the kids can learn to walk, talk, read and write at their own pace, but swimming is a must," she said.  Zach was swimming independently at age 2 and Naia is getting there with weekly practice, Ms. Wallach said.

Both parents are up-to-date in basic first aid, and Mr. Vibbert was certified in emergency medical services.

Some families feel comfortable starting with even younger children.

"For us, sailing with babies was easy," Michelle Elvy, who has been sailing the world with her family for almost 12 years, said in an email from Bali, where she is currently moored with her husband, Bernie, and their daughters, Lola, 12, and Jana, 9, both of whom came aboard when they were less than a year old.

"They are flexible and adaptable; they require very little," she said. "Teens require more: more space, more food, more equipment, more contact with friends."

But working up to long voyages and feeling confident in your  abilities as a parent and crew member are also vital, she said.  "If you want your children to feel safe and secure, it's important you can sail and navigate as well as your partner," she said. "Unexpected things will happen offshore, no question about it. It's how you handle them that really matters."

Ms. Elvy said that lifesaving gear, like jackets, rafts and ditch kits (maritime survival gear) should be kept in easy-to-reach places while offshore, not in closets; and basic safety mantras have been ingrained in their children since they were babies: Do not climb on lifelines; always tell a parent when you are going outside, even when at anchor; keep one hand on the boat at all times; no urinating over the side while the boat is underway and no jumping in the dinghy.

"I see many small children and babies in a dinghy without life jackets and that, to me, is inviting trouble," Ms. Elvy said. On the boat, however,  "it's downright impossible, and potentially dangerous," she added, as a small child's short arms can't reach the hand holds while in a jacket.  "Kids need to be flexible and balanced, which is almost impossible for roly-poly toddlers. So for us, the harness was always the more important piece of equipment."

How did they get their toddler-age children to listen?   "On a sailboat, as everywhere else, I imagine, the best way to teach children is by example," she said.  "We harness on as soon as we leave the safety of the cabin," she said.  "We attach ourselves to jacklines when we move to the bow. And when a toy falls overboard, we all watch it disappear together. Together we say goodbye, together we learn lessons about attachment and letting go."

And although her children have tested her in plenty of other ways, she said she believes that learning to follow directions  is so closely related to the value of their lives that they internalized the message early on and have not tested that boundary since.

The Coast Guard offers safety tips and regulations for boaters of all ages, in particular which type of life jackets are required and at what age.  "We always tell people to wear their life jackets, file a float plan with friends and family and make sure you have enough food and water,"  said Petty Officer Third Class Loumania Stewart.  "Our main message is that all safety equipment is in good working order and ready to go, especially when dealing with children." But in general, the organization refrains from making any recommendations on how old a child should be for any kind of voyage.

The same is true for the American Boating Association.

"Different states have different rules on personal flotation devices and which safety classes and certifications are required," said Mike Anderson, the association's director.  "The A.B.A. is all about safety and boating, but there are certain life choices people have to make on their own."

Mr. Anderson and his wife, Alison, sailed the East Coast, the Intracoastal Waterway and the Bahamas with their children, who were 2, 6 and 7 at the time.  "Whether or not to sail with kids is really a call you make as a parent based on the boat and your level of skill," he said, and knowing when not to sail matters as well.  "If the weather gets bad, you just don't go."

Parents who sail with their children say that they learn how to live conservatively, with little waste, and that they've grown up strong, adaptable and  curious, with respect for other cultures and the bond of family.  Pam Wall, who has spoken out a number of times in defense of the Kaufmans, said that the sooner you can  put  children afloat, the better. Ms. Wall, a consultant for those interested in learning how to cruise, and her late husband, Andy, were both experienced sailors and  took their children, Samantha and James, aboard when they were infants. The  children made their first extended trips from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to the Bahamas when they were  2 and  11/2 months, respectively; and in 1985, when the  children were 4 and 8, the family began a more than six-year cruise around the world.

To prepare for that trip, Ms. Wall looked for  expertise, getting certified as a ham radio operator and taking a course in trauma response, where she learned C.P.R., how to set a broken limb, stitch a wound and administer saline solutions, a vital skill, as children dehydrate easily.

With the help of her family doctor, she created a comprehensive medical kit tailored to her family's needs, including instructions on which medications should be given to the children and when.

"The parents are the ones who are solely responsible for the child's life on the boat," Ms. Wall said. "There's no policeman, no doctor and understanding the environment they're in is essential to their safety."

Barrie North will begin a multiyear voyage in August with his wife, Sarah, and three sons, 7, 9 and 11. He said that his family spent a lot of time choosing a sturdy, safe and slow boat, a 1974 Tartan 41, which can ride out a serious storm. As part of  its training, the family set out in Lake Champlain in Vermont in 20-knot winds to test their skills.

But there are always unknowns, Behan Gifford, who is currently cruising the South Pacific with her husband, Jamie, and their three children, said in an email.  "It's at some point an impossible speculation to try and nail all the things you could or should do," she said,  "whether you live on land or live on a boat. Like anything it's about having patience, and tiptoeing toward experience that you need for the challenges you wish to take on."

______

Some safety points for sailing with children. 

Use safety harnesses to keep kids on board.

Life jackets should be worn on deck and on the dock and be age-appropriate, with crotch straps and head supports for infants and toddlers.

Keep rafts and ditch kits easily accessible.

Get certified in C.P.R. and trauma response.

Double (or triple) communication options with high-frequency radios, satellite phones and emergency position indicating radio beacons (or EPIRBs)

Take safety-at-sea classes.

Learn as much as you can about weather patterns.

Teach children to keep one hand on the boat at all times.

Teach them to swim in the ocean.

Keep medical kits stocked, including various types of antibiotics.

No swimming while sailing offshore.

Live aboard before sailing.

Stay rested; avoid fatigue.

Don't bring anything aboard you can't fix yourself or do without if it breaks.


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In Transit Blog: A Whole New Meaning for Food to Go

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 15 April 2014 | 17.35

Top chefs have been known to open satellite restaurants worldwide. Now a few of the world's most respected chefs are moving abroad for limited culinary residencies.

"A long-lasting dream of mine has come to fruition: Restaurant Noma is moving to Japan for two months in the beginning of 2015," announced René Redzepi, chef and owner of Noma in Copenhagen, in an email and on his website, promising more details in June.

A few days later, the British chef Heston Blumenthal said that he intended to close the Fat Duck in Bray, England, and move the operation, including most of its staff, to Crown Resorts in Melbourne, Australia, for six months beginning in February 2015. The hiatus will allow for a much-needed renovation and expansion of the Bray kitchen.

"They don't have a historic food culture as, say, Italy, Spain or France do, so the Australian public are incredibly open-minded and excited to try new things," said Mr. Blumenthal, who turned down Las Vegas and Courchevel, France, for Melbourne.

When the Fat Duck returns to England, the chef will open a copy of his London restaurant Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, highlighting historic British recipes, in the Australian space.

And in Bermuda, the chef Marcus Samuelsson, who is based in New York, will open Samuelsson at HP from June 3 to Aug. 3 at the Fairmont Hamilton Princess hotel. The pop-up will serve island-inspired dishes and the chef expects to follow up in May 2015 with a full-fledged, and as-yet unnamed, new restaurant.

A version of this article appears in print on 04/13/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: A Whole New Meaning for Food to Go.

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In Transit Blog: When Boating With Young Children

Still want to take your children out onto the open sea? You've got company.

The failed sailing trip across the Pacific Ocean by the Kaufman family  — the parents Charlotte and Eric and their daughters, Cora, 3, and Lyra, 1 — has prompted a vigorous debate about the wisdom of embarking on such a voyage with young children that has continued even after the  United States Navy warship that helped rescue them arrived in San Diego on Wednesday.

While many parents, including experienced sailors, have questioned whether infants and toddlers should be involved in such a trip (Lyra had developed a fever, a rash and diarrhea, and the boat was adrift), there is a small but thriving community of travelers who insist that there is a safe way to embark on an off-the-grid family voyage by sea, and that the benefits far outweigh the risks.

The age of children and preparation for the endeavor are significant factors. But each family has its own standards.

Cindy Wallach, a writer, and her husband, Doug Vibbert, have lived on a sailboat since 1998 and cruised from Annapolis, Md.,  to the Caribbean until they had their children, Zach, now 9, and Naia, 3. Although both children have lived aboard since they were born and often sail the Chesapeake Bay with their parents on two- to seven-day excursions, the couple is waiting until the children are a bit older before taking them on any longer passages.

"They're not ready yet, we're still saving up money, getting the boat ready," Ms. Wallach said. "There are a lot of logistics to it." Our to-do list is now twice as long because we know what we're getting into. So we're taking our time."

A great resource, she said, is the tight-knit  "tribe" of sailing families around the world who are chatting online nightly through email, Skype and instant messaging and sharing their stories and experiences through blogs and forums.  "We hash things over and help each other out," she said. (There are numerous resources for cruising safely with children, including Womenandcruising.com and Cruisingworld.com, both of which have forums.) Most families take anywhere from six months to two years to prepare before crossing an ocean, practicing with coastal hops and building up to overnight trips.  "You see what breaks, you see what you can handle," Ms. Wallach said.

Water safety rules are  a big part of their daily life, as they have always lived aboard. The children wear personal flotation devices when on the deck of the boat or on the dock and know what to do in a man-overboard situation.  "My daughter can be running full speed in the grass around the marina, and she will stop cold and sit down and wait for me at the beginning of the dock," Ms. Wallach said.

And the family is very serious about swimming.  "We joke that the kids can learn to walk, talk, read and write at their own pace, but swimming is a must," she said.  Zach was swimming independently at age 2 and Naia is getting there with weekly practice, Ms. Wallach said.

Both parents are up-to-date in basic first aid, and Mr. Vibbert was certified in emergency medical services.

Some families feel comfortable starting with even younger children.

"For us, sailing with babies was easy," Michelle Elvy, who has been sailing the world with her family for almost 12 years, said in an email from Bali, where she is currently moored with her husband, Bernie, and their daughters, Lola, 12, and Jana, 9, both of whom came aboard when they were less than a year old.

"They are flexible and adaptable; they require very little," she said. "Teens require more: more space, more food, more equipment, more contact with friends."

But working up to long voyages and feeling confident in your  abilities as a parent and crew member are also vital, she said.  "If you want your children to feel safe and secure, it's important you can sail and navigate as well as your partner," she said. "Unexpected things will happen offshore, no question about it. It's how you handle them that really matters."

Ms. Elvy said that lifesaving gear, like jackets, rafts and ditch kits (maritime survival gear) should be kept in easy-to-reach places while offshore, not in closets; and basic safety mantras have been ingrained in their children since they were babies: Do not climb on lifelines; always tell a parent when you are going outside, even when at anchor; keep one hand on the boat at all times; no urinating over the side while the boat is underway and no jumping in the dinghy.

"I see many small children and babies in a dinghy without life jackets and that, to me, is inviting trouble," Ms. Elvy said. On the boat, however,  "it's downright impossible, and potentially dangerous," she added, as a small child's short arms can't reach the hand holds while in a jacket.  "Kids need to be flexible and balanced, which is almost impossible for roly-poly toddlers. So for us, the harness was always the more important piece of equipment."

How did they get their toddler-age children to listen?   "On a sailboat, as everywhere else, I imagine, the best way to teach children is by example," she said.  "We harness on as soon as we leave the safety of the cabin," she said.  "We attach ourselves to jacklines when we move to the bow. And when a toy falls overboard, we all watch it disappear together. Together we say goodbye, together we learn lessons about attachment and letting go."

And although her children have tested her in plenty of other ways, she said she believes that learning to follow directions  is so closely related to the value of their lives that they internalized the message early on and have not tested that boundary since.

The Coast Guard offers safety tips and regulations for boaters of all ages, in particular which type of life jackets are required and at what age.  "We always tell people to wear their life jackets, file a float plan with friends and family and make sure you have enough food and water,"  said Petty Officer Third Class Loumania Stewart.  "Our main message is that all safety equipment is in good working order and ready to go, especially when dealing with children." But in general, the organization refrains from making any recommendations on how old a child should be for any kind of voyage.

The same is true for the American Boating Association.

"Different states have different rules on personal flotation devices and which safety classes and certifications are required," said Mike Anderson, the association's director.  "The A.B.A. is all about safety and boating, but there are certain life choices people have to make on their own."

Mr. Anderson and his wife, Alison, sailed the East Coast, the Intracoastal Waterway and the Bahamas with their children, who were 2, 6 and 7 at the time.  "Whether or not to sail with kids is really a call you make as a parent based on the boat and your level of skill," he said, and knowing when not to sail matters as well.  "If the weather gets bad, you just don't go."

Parents who sail with their children say that they learn how to live conservatively, with little waste, and that they've grown up strong, adaptable and  curious, with respect for other cultures and the bond of family.  Pam Wall, who has spoken out a number of times in defense of the Kaufmans, said that the sooner you can  put  children afloat, the better. Ms. Wall, a consultant for those interested in learning how to cruise, and her late husband, Andy, were both experienced sailors and  took their children, Samantha and James, aboard when they were infants. The  children made their first extended trips from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to the Bahamas when they were  2 and  11/2 months, respectively; and in 1985, when the  children were 4 and 8, the family began a more than six-year cruise around the world.

To prepare for that trip, Ms. Wall looked for  expertise, getting certified as a ham radio operator and taking a course in trauma response, where she learned C.P.R., how to set a broken limb, stitch a wound and administer saline solutions, a vital skill, as children dehydrate easily.

With the help of her family doctor, she created a comprehensive medical kit tailored to her family's needs, including instructions on which medications should be given to the children and when.

"The parents are the ones who are solely responsible for the child's life on the boat," Ms. Wall said. "There's no policeman, no doctor and understanding the environment they're in is essential to their safety."

Barrie North will begin a multiyear voyage in August with his wife, Sarah, and three sons, 7, 9 and 11. He said that his family spent a lot of time choosing a sturdy, safe and slow boat, a 1974 Tartan 41, which can ride out a serious storm. As part of  its training, the family set out in Lake Champlain in Vermont in 20-knot winds to test their skills.

But there are always unknowns, Behan Gifford, who is currently cruising the South Pacific with her husband, Jamie, and their three children, said in an email.  "It's at some point an impossible speculation to try and nail all the things you could or should do," she said,  "whether you live on land or live on a boat. Like anything it's about having patience, and tiptoeing toward experience that you need for the challenges you wish to take on."

______

Some safety points for sailing with children. 

Use safety harnesses to keep kids on board.

Life jackets should be worn on deck and on the dock and be age-appropriate, with crotch straps and head supports for infants and toddlers.

Keep rafts and ditch kits easily accessible.

Get certified in C.P.R. and trauma response.

Double (or triple) communication options with high-frequency radios, satellite phones and emergency position indicating radio beacons (or EPIRBs)

Take safety-at-sea classes.

Learn as much as you can about weather patterns.

Teach children to keep one hand on the boat at all times.

Teach them to swim in the ocean.

Keep medical kits stocked, including various types of antibiotics.

No swimming while sailing offshore.

Live aboard before sailing.

Stay rested; avoid fatigue.

Don't bring anything aboard you can't fix yourself or do without if it breaks.


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T Magazine: Food Matters | In Monte Carlo, the First All-Organic Restaurant to Receive a Michelin Star

In Monaco, carrots just might be the new caviar. "For me, luxury is eating baby peas that were picked an hour earlier or maybe a carrot that was just pulled out of the ground," says the chef Paolo Sari, whose cooking at Elsa — a sunny restaurant at the suavely bohemian, India Mahdavi-designed Monte Carlo Beach Hotel — recently won him the first Michelin star ever awarded to a 100 percent organic establishment.

Sari is a Venice native whose peripatetic career has included stints at the Four Seasons in London, several kitchens in Sardinia, Bice in New York, the Mondrian Hotel in Los Angeles and a hotel kitchen on Jeju, a volcanic island a hundred miles off the coast of South Korea. It was the latter experience, which included a three-month stay in a Buddhist monastery there, that caused his ideas about cooking to change. "The monks were such healthy, peaceful people," he says. "They lived on the vegetables and rice they grew and locally caught fish. In its simplicity, their food was delicious, and as a Venetian, it made sense to me, since so much of what I ate as a child came from the Venetian lagoon and the 200 little islands around Venice." When he returned to Europe and took the job at Elsa, he says, "I wanted to create an occidental version of the food I ate on Jeju."

Glittery Monaco might seem like an improbable setting in which to concoct a cooking style Sari describes as "simple, healthy and natural," but the principality has actually been in the locavore vanguard ever since the Mediterranean menu at the Louis XV restaurant in the Hotel de Paris, created by Chef Alain Ducasse, won three Michelin stars in 1990. "Adding organic to the locavore equation required a lot of research," Sari says. But the restaurant was able to build a network of small organic farmers to supply its fruit and vegetables, and more than 90 percent of its produce comes from within a radius of 60 miles. Elsa — named after the American society chronicler Elsa Maxwell, who launched the Monte Carlo Beach Hotel in 1929 — was also awarded a level-three label (the strictest possible) by Ecocert, the respected French organic certification agency.

When a visually stunning dish like Sari's "Bio Sama," an artful tumble of vegetables — shaved baby carrots, wild asparagus, fava beans, radishes, fennel — and edible flowers dressed with organic extra-virgin olive oil and Camargue sea salt comes to the table, it's an earnest invitation to meditate on the essential taste of the vegetables. Other dishes, like a carpaccio of San Remo shrimp garnished with tiny cubes of pink grapefruit, shaved baby fennel bulb, bergamot oil and a little caviar, amp up the menu's sensuality. Even the bread — baked with organic Italian flour and served with four different kinds of organic olive oil — requires your undivided attention.

Though Sari makes some superb gnocchi, risotto and pasta, the catch-of-the-day is the real star of his menu; on a recent visit, he served a superb filet of grilled sériole (amberjack) with a sauce marinière (fish fumet, white wine and herbs) and baby vegetables. The single cheese course is a dazzling tasting plate of 3-year-old organic Parmesan prepared as an ice cream, dribbled with 25-year-old balsamic vinegar, Parmesan-cream-filled barbajuan (Monegasque ravioli) and shavings of the cheese. And the dessert not to miss is the Sicilian almond soufflé.

Sari is now working on making the hotel's three other restaurants all-organic, too. "Many people still associate healthy eating with gastronomic deprivation," he says. "I want to show people that the best-tasting foods are also the ones that are good for you."


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In Transit Blog: Once a Palace, Now a Lake Como Hotel

Most of the upscale hotels in Lake Como, Italy, have been around for decades, but that's set to change on June 1 with the opening of Il Palazzo del Vice Re in the medieval lakeside  village of Lezzeno.

The five-room luxury property is a renovated Italian Renaissance palace that was home to the viceroys of Spain in the 16th and 17th centuries when the Spanish ruled the territory. The rooms range between 320 and 2,500 square feet and are each uniquely decorated.

A two-level suite, for example, has antique furniture and a large covered terrace with views of the lake and the  surrounding mountains while another room has high ceilings and hand-painted 18th-century frescoes of the Greek god Juno.

Guests get a range of  included amenities like breakfast, afternoon tea, Wi-Fi, bikes for exploring the area, toiletries made nearby using locally grown lavender, and wine and cheese tastings in the cantina.

The manager, Andrea Grisdale, said the appeal of the property is getting an authentic experience in what can be a touristy region.

"This is not a town that travelers typically visit, and your neighbors are all locals, so you really get a sense of place," she said.

The hotel will close mid-November for the winter and reopen again on March 1 of next year. Rates from 280 euros (about $377) a night for two people.


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