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T Magazine: Eataly-Style Food Halls Are Taking Over America

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 22 Juli 2014 | 17.35

Ever since Todd English opened his upscale food court and market at the Plaza Hotel in the summer of 2010, the notion of combining communal dining space and artisan grocery shopping has caught fire in New York. English's endeavor was soon followed by Mario Batali's Italian food emporium Eataly, where patrons can snack on charcuterie, drink wine and purchase artisanal produce. At the end of 2013 Gotham West Market opened in Hell's Kitchen with stalls serving ramen, tapas and microbrews, in addition to gourmet foodstuffs and sundries. Downtown, Battery Park residents can now patronize Hudson Eats, yet another swanky, upscale food court. And now, other cities around the country are getting in the game. Here are five new (or upgraded) food halls in Denver, Seattle, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and Atlanta.

Photo
MELROSE MARKET From left: the bottle shop at Bar Ferd'nand; a full table; a plate of fish and fiddlehead fern at Sitka & Spruce.Credit

Melrose Market
Seattle, Wash.
Local chef Matt Dillion's restaurant Sitka & Spruce is the only sit-down meal option at Melrose Market; his bar, Bar' Ferd'nand, across from the restaurant serves as a de facto waiting area. His kitchen uses ingredients from vendors in the market, including local meats from the Rain Shadow Meats butcher and cheeses by The Calf & Kid. Dinner options range from $5 appetizers to $32 entrees. On-site is Melrose Market Studios, an event venue that holds up to 250 people. The Homegrown Sustainable Sandwich Shop, a Melrose Market vendor, tops the list of the Studios' catering offerings.
1501-1535 Melrose Ave., Seattle, Wash., melrosemarketseattle.com

Photo
READING TERMINAL MARKET Clockwise from left: a brass sculpture of a pig greets hungry customers; the immense selection at Kauffman's; a selection of oils at Tubby Olive.Credit

Reading Terminal Market
Philadelphia, Penn.
After a $3.6 million renovation to this historic indoor market in a former train station last year, its longtime merchants, including Pennsylvania Dutch farmers, have returned. The 80 vendors include 34 restaurants. Post-renovation newcomers include Wursthaus Schmitz, a German grocery and sausage stand that serves sandwiches ($9-11); the Head Nut, which offers spices, teas, nuts and candy; and the Tubby Olive, a gourmet olive oil ($16-31 a bottle) and vinegar shop.
51 N 12th Street, Philadelphia, Penn., readingterminalmarket.org

Photo
UNION MARKET Clockwise, from left: the spread at Righteous Cheese; diners at the picnic-style tables; patrons line up at Red Apron.Credit

Union Market
Washington, D.C.
Close to 40 vendors have stalls here, but unlike some of the other markets on this list, Union Market features "pop-up artisans," established brands with storefronts elsewhere, in addition to its regulars. Number 1 Sons has brought their natural, fermented foods, including pickles, krauts and kimchi, and Teaism has set up a small Union Market outpost as well. Toki Underground, a popular ramen house in the area, begins selling "street food breakfast" in the market at 8 a.m., Tuesday through Saturday, and shutters the stand when it sells out.
1309 5th St. NE, Washington, D.C., unionmarketdc.com

Photo
THE SOURCE Clockwise from left: graffitied eating space at Acorn; floral-printed bread at Babette's; floral arrangements at Beet and Yarrow.Credit Luca Venter

The Source
Denver, Col.
In 2013, a former foundry became the home to artisanal bakery Babettes and an array of flower shops and juice bars in between. Dining options include Comida, which serves up a variety of tacos ($3-4) and watermelon jalapeño margaritas ($8) on the patio; and Acorn, whose locally sourced ingredients are prepared in an oak-fired oven and can be paired with a number of small-batch beers ($9-40).
3350 Brighton Blvd., Denver, Col. thesourcedenver.com

Photo
KROG STREET MARKET Clockwise from left: brisket by Grand Champion BBQ; an aerial view of the market to-be; tacos from Superica.Credit

Krog Street Market
Atlanta, Ga.
This soon-to-open food hall, located in a 1920s warehouse in the Inman Park neighborhood, has been getting heavily hyped on area food blogs. Among the expected offerings: the Luminary, the first restaurant by the "Top Chef" contestant and Atlanta native Eli Kirshtein. Todd Ginsberg, known for the local restaurant the General Muir, will serve burgers and banh mi at Fred's Meat & Bread. Among the numerous food stalls are Grand Champion BBQ and Gu's Dumplings, along with bakeries and cheese and flower shops.
99 Krog St. Atlanta, Ga., krogstreetmarket.com


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In Transit Blog: First for the Press, Now for a Rest

Photo The Volkshotel opened last month in Amsterdam.Credit Leonor von Salisch

Billing itself as "a place to rest, or not sleep at all," Amsterdam's revved-up Volkshotel opened last month in the former headquarters of the Volkskrant, one of the country's largest and most progressive newspapers.

After the newspaper moved out in 2007, the space in East Amsterdam became a creative work hub with two bars. Funneling that energy, Volkshotel refreshed the existing basement club and a seventh-floor restaurant and bar (now with a panorama view), while the reception area houses a cafe and shared workspace for creatives.

As for the "rest" part, the Volkshotel has 172 three-star standard rooms for two to four people, in sizes ranging from compact to sprawling — "suitable for couples, families, or an entire rock band," according to press material. The Dutch designer Bas van Tol of Studio Müller Van Tol decorated interiors with magnified newspaper cutouts and kept the original elements of steel, wood, concrete and glass.

In nine additional individually designed high-concept "special rooms," themes range from camping to "Japanese-style bathing." Guests seeking a soak and a sauna can visit the eighth-floor rooftop hot tubs with a view.

As an introductory offer in July, all double rooms will cost 69 euros, about $90. Otherwise, rooms range from 69 euros in low season to 199 in high season.


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In Transit Blog: Walkabout: Malaysia Airlines Offers Refunds

Photo A Malaysia Airlines plane prepares for landing at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport on July 21. The carrier said it would offer refunds to customers who want to cancel their tickets.Credit Mohd Rasfan/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Walkabout

A weekly capsule of travel news curated by our writers and editors.

Fallout Following last week's Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 disaster, the carrier says it will offer full refunds to travelers who wish to cancel their tickets, while those wanting to postpone their flights can do so without penalty. (CNN)

Safety Streak Ends The year 2012 was the safest since World War II for air travel, and 2013 was even better. Because of the two Malaysian Airlines crashes this year will not be the safest on record. (The New York Times)

One-upmanship Airbus beat rival Boeing in the aircraft order stakes at this year's Farnborough International Airshow, garnering more than twice as many orders and commitments. (USA Today)

Mapping Beauty Forget fastest route. Yahoo is developing an algorithm that will allow you to choose the scenic route. (Smithsonian)


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In Transit Blog: Airbnb Unveils Warm Logo as It Gets Cool Legal Eye

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 21 Juli 2014 | 17.35

Photo Airbnb's new logo, whose design users can customize.Credit

Airbnb, the online lodging site that has recently provoked the ire of local governments in Barcelona, San Francisco and New York City, is out to win the public's affection with its new logo — an inverted, loopy heart.

It has a name, too: the bélo.

Joe Gebbia, a founder of Airbnb, explained that the French-inflected neologism comes from the word "belonging."

"It's a symbol that goes beyond representing the company and represents that things can be shared," he said. "This is much more than a corporate logo."

Whether the bélo supplants the peace sign remains to be seen. For the moment, those who stand to benefit from the company's rebranding are its hosts, who can customize the logo by color and design and print their individualized creations on mugs, T-shirts, stickers, even notepads.

"We're giving hosts the tools to brand themselves within our larger brand," Mr. Gebbia said.

Meanwhile, government officials like Eric T. Schneiderman, the New York State attorney general, would like to bring governmental oversight to the entrepreneurship of those hosts. Last fall Mr. Schneiderman subpoenaed Airbnb, which has listings in 34,000 places in 192 countries and is valued at close to $10 billion, for information on thousands of hosts in New York City. Some, he argued, may be violating a 2010 state law that bars renters from subletting properties for fewer than 30 days if they are not present.

Mr. Schneiderman was not after individual apartment owners — neither the legal kind who rent rooms in their homes while they're present and whom Airbnb has featured in a promotional campaign in New York City this summer, nor those who rent out their homes while they're away for a weekend, technically illegal though that might be.

In a New York Times Op-Ed piece, Mr. Schneiderman wrote that he was targeting "large, commercial enterprises with dozens of apartments — truly illegal hotels."

In May, Airbnb and New York officials reached an agreement: Mr. Schneiderman would get the information he was seeking about Airbnb hosts, but it will be stripped of names and other personally identifiable information.

That the company's warm and fuzzy rebranding comes on the heels of the dispute is purely coincidental, said Nick Papas, a spokesman for Airbnb. "This initiative began more than a year ago and was part of our ongoing effort to strengthen our brand around the world," he said.


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In Transit Blog: Bilbo Baggins Slept Here

Photo A stop along the way in a tour in New Zealand exploring the world of Tolkien characters.Credit Hobbiton Movie Set Tours

It's dinner and a movie … set. The Hobbiton Movie Set in New Zealand, as seen in the screen adaptations of J. R. R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy and "The Hobbit," is offering night tours of Bilbo Baggins's homeland.

The new dinner tours (adults, 175 New Zealand dollars, or about $150 at 1.16 New Zealand dollars to the United States dollar; ages 10 to 14, 140 dollars; ages 5 to 9, 100 dollars; and younger, free) take visitors on a guided stroll through the Shire at dusk, followed by a banquet at the Green Dragon. The latter is recognizable from "The Hobbit" as the place where Bilbo began his journey with the dwarves, and it is celebrated in song by the hobbits Pippin and Merry in "The Return of the King."

All exterior shots of the Shire were filmed here, and the interior of the Green Dragon, which last year was transformed into a fully working pub, seems straight out of Middle Earth. It's a location that organizers say draws some 240,000 guests a year, though the evening tours are limited to 48 diners.

Dinner is followed by a lantern-lit visit to the set, with welcoming hobbit holes festively illuminated and chimneys smoking, reminiscent of the events of Bilbo's "eleventy-first" birthday, as seen in "The Fellowship of the Ring." Other recognizable Shire set locations include the mill, the bridge and the party tree, where Bilbo made his farewell speech and disappeared using the One Ring. The tours, which last four hours, include a banquet dinner, a drink from the Green Dragon's Southfarthing line of craft ales and transportation. They are offered every Wednesday. Reservations: hobbitontours.com.

A version of this article appears in print on 07/20/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: New Zealand: Bilbo Baggins Slept Here.


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In Transit Blog: Lights, Camera, Action . . . Vacation!

Photo The Rome Cavalieri, which holds tours of places in Rome relevant to the film "La Grande Bellezza."Credit Rome Cavalieri

Rome's tourists are venerated and degraded in "La Grande Bellezza" ("The Great Beauty"), a film by the Italian director Paolo Sorrentino that won this year's Oscar for best foreign film. Whatever its views of visitors, the movie acts as an irresistible invitation to the Eternal City's more subtly beguiling attractions, as its suave protagonist and the audience are coolly guided through hidden courtyards, historic palazzos and less-frequented works of architecture.

It's a journey worth emulating, according to the Rome Cavalieri, a Waldorf-Astoria Hotel offering guests their own guided tour of destinations featured in the film, including the apartments at Palazzo Sacchetti (the palace of the Marquis Sacchetti, normally open to the public only for a hefty price), a luncheon at the home of the Marchioness Violante Guerrieri Gonzaga, and a few inevitable sites, like the Colosseum.

The full-day excursion begins at the Fontana dell'Acqua Paola on Janiculum Hill, followed by a visit to the Tempietto (tomb) at Donato Bramante's San Pietro church in Montorio and a walk across Baccio Pontelli's Ponte Sisto bridge to see Borromini's illusory corridor at the Palazzo Spada in Rome's historic district, where the courtyards of Renaissance palaces will be open. Later, the tour stops for a private lunch and reception on the rooftop terrace of the Marchioness's Palazzo Taverna before heading to the Via Veneto neighborhood and the ancient baths at Caracalla. It finishes with a rarely seen view of the city through the keyhole of a door on Aventine Hill.

Alexandra Massini, the hotel's resident art historian, is the guide. The tour, as well as lunch and transportation, can be customized but must be booked at least 10 days in advance and at least three weeks ahead if participants plan on lunch at the Palazzo Taverna. Rates start at 1,345 euros, or about $1,790 at $1.33 to the euro, for five and vary for smaller groups and individuals. Those rates do not include the hotel, which starts at 290 euros for a room with a twin bed. Reservations: 39-06-3509-2040 or romhi.concierge@waldorfastoria.com.

A version of this article appears in print on 07/20/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Lights, Camera, Action ... Vacation!.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Bilbo Baggins Slept Here

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 20 Juli 2014 | 17.35

Photo A stop along the way in a tour in New Zealand exploring the world of Tolkien characters.Credit Hobbiton Movie Set Tours

It's dinner and a movie … set. The Hobbiton Movie Set in New Zealand, as seen in the screen adaptations of J. R. R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy and "The Hobbit," is offering night tours of Bilbo Baggins's homeland.

The new dinner tours (adults, 175 New Zealand dollars, or about $150 at 1.16 New Zealand dollars to the United States dollar; ages 10 to 14, 140 dollars; ages 5 to 9, 100 dollars; and younger, free) take visitors on a guided stroll through the Shire at dusk, followed by a banquet at the Green Dragon. The latter is recognizable from "The Hobbit" as the place where Bilbo began his journey with the dwarves, and it is celebrated in song by the hobbits Pippin and Merry in "The Return of the King."

All exterior shots of the Shire were filmed here, and the interior of the Green Dragon, which last year was transformed into a fully working pub, seems straight out of Middle Earth. It's a location that organizers say draws some 240,000 guests a year, though the evening tours are limited to 48 diners.

Dinner is followed by a lantern-lit visit to the set, with welcoming hobbit holes festively illuminated and chimneys smoking, reminiscent of the events of Bilbo's "eleventy-first" birthday, as seen in "The Fellowship of the Ring." Other recognizable Shire set locations include the mill, the bridge and the party tree, where Bilbo made his farewell speech and disappeared using the One Ring. The tours, which last four hours, include a banquet dinner, a drink from the Green Dragon's Southfarthing line of craft ales and transportation. They are offered every Wednesday. Reservations: hobbitontours.com.

A version of this article appears in print on 07/20/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: New Zealand: Bilbo Baggins Slept Here.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Airbnb Unveils Warm Logo as It Gets Cool Legal Eye

Photo Airbnb's new logo, whose design users can customize.Credit

Airbnb, the online lodging site that has recently provoked the ire of local governments in Barcelona, San Francisco and New York City, is out to win the public's affection with its new logo — an inverted, loopy heart.

It has a name, too: the bélo.

Joe Gebbia, a founder of Airbnb, explained that the French-inflected neologism comes from the word "belonging."

"It's a symbol that goes beyond representing the company and represents that things can be shared," he said. "This is much more than a corporate logo."

Whether the bélo supplants the peace sign remains to be seen. For the moment, those who stand to benefit from the company's rebranding are its hosts, who can customize the logo by color and design and print their individualized creations on mugs, T-shirts, stickers, even notepads.

"We're giving hosts the tools to brand themselves within our larger brand," Mr. Gebbia said.

Meanwhile, government officials like Eric T. Schneiderman, the New York State attorney general, would like to bring governmental oversight to the entrepreneurship of those hosts. Last fall Mr. Schneiderman subpoenaed Airbnb, which has listings in 34,000 places in 192 countries and is valued at close to $10 billion, for information on thousands of hosts in New York City. Some, he argued, may be violating a 2010 state law that bars renters from subletting properties for fewer than 30 days if they are not present.

Mr. Schneiderman was not after individual apartment owners — neither the legal kind who rent rooms in their homes while they're present and whom Airbnb has featured in a promotional campaign in New York City this summer, nor those who rent out their homes while they're away for a weekend, technically illegal though that might be.

In a New York Times Op-Ed piece, Mr. Schneiderman wrote that he was targeting "large, commercial enterprises with dozens of apartments — truly illegal hotels."

In May, Airbnb and New York officials reached an agreement: Mr. Schneiderman would get the information he was seeking about Airbnb hosts, but it will be stripped of names and other personally identifiable information.

That the company's warm and fuzzy rebranding comes on the heels of the dispute is purely coincidental, said Nick Papas, a spokesman for Airbnb. "This initiative began more than a year ago and was part of our ongoing effort to strengthen our brand around the world," he said.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: Accommodations | A Buzzy Hotel Oasis in West Hollywood

In West Hollywood, the San Vicente Inn is gradually being transformed by the boutique hotelier Jeff Klein, who is garnering lots of attention for turning the historically gay, seedy hotel into a clean and chic place for the young and beautiful to shack up on a budget (rooms range from $99 to $209 per night). Now known as the San Vicente Bungalows, the 29-room property has undergone basic renovations — like spiffed-up bathrooms, now stocked with Malin & Goetz products — that are attracting the 20- to 30-something international jet set. In addition to bright and cozy digs, guests enjoy free breakfast and can rent beach cruisers ($15 for 4 hours) to ride out to places like Venice Beach and Santa Monica, each just about 45 minutes away by bike. Even the locals are popping in for a swim — access to the pool and newly landscaped grounds is $35/day. Eventually, the now-charming place will get a complete makeover. So T checked into the buzzy little oasis to memorialize things as they stand now, while summer is in full swing.

845 North San Vicente Boulevard, West Hollywood, thesanvicenteinn.com.


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In Transit Blog: Lights, Camera, Action . . . Vacation!

Photo The Rome Cavalieri, which holds tours of places in Rome relevant to the film "La Grande Bellezza."Credit Rome Cavalieri

Rome's tourists are venerated and degraded in "La Grande Bellezza" ("The Great Beauty"), a film by the Italian director Paolo Sorrentino that won this year's Oscar for best foreign film. Whatever its views of visitors, the movie acts as an irresistible invitation to the Eternal City's more subtly beguiling attractions, as its suave protagonist and the audience are coolly guided through hidden courtyards, historic palazzos and less-frequented works of architecture.

It's a journey worth emulating, according to the Rome Cavalieri, a Waldorf-Astoria Hotel offering guests their own guided tour of destinations featured in the film, including the apartments at Palazzo Sacchetti (the palace of the Marquis Sacchetti, normally open to the public only for a hefty price), a luncheon at the home of the Marchioness Violante Guerrieri Gonzaga, and a few inevitable sites, like the Colosseum.

The full-day excursion begins at the Fontana dell'Acqua Paola on Janiculum Hill, followed by a visit to the Tempietto (tomb) at Donato Bramante's San Pietro church in Montorio and a walk across Baccio Pontelli's Ponte Sisto bridge to see Borromini's illusory corridor at the Palazzo Spada in Rome's historic district, where the courtyards of Renaissance palaces will be open. Later, the tour stops for a private lunch and reception on the rooftop terrace of the Marchioness's Palazzo Taverna before heading to the Via Veneto neighborhood and the ancient baths at Caracalla. It finishes with a rarely seen view of the city through the keyhole of a door on Aventine Hill.

Alexandra Massini, the hotel's resident art historian, is the guide. The tour, as well as lunch and transportation, can be customized but must be booked at least 10 days in advance and at least three weeks ahead if participants plan on lunch at the Palazzo Taverna. Rates start at 1,345 euros, or about $1,790 at $1.33 to the euro, for five and vary for smaller groups and individuals. Those rates do not include the hotel, which starts at 290 euros for a room with a twin bed. Reservations: 39-06-3509-2040 or romhi.concierge@waldorfastoria.com.

A version of this article appears in print on 07/20/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Lights, Camera, Action ... Vacation!.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More
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