Diberdayakan oleh Blogger.

Popular Posts Today

In Transit Blog: On Yelp, Reviews With a Side of Bookings

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 27 Oktober 2014 | 17.35

Yelp, the online user-review and ratings site of everything from restaurants to spas to churches, is entering the hotel-booking game.

On Tuesday, it announced a partnership with Hipmunk, a travel search engine that lets people browse flights and hotels by a combination of factors like pricing, layover duration and amenities. Hipmunk, already in partnerships with direct-booking sites like Getaroom and Hotels.com, now supports a small number of hotels on Yelp. Users will now be able to book hotel rooms through it, without ever leaving Yelp's site.

Rachel Walker, a Yelp spokeswoman, would not specify the number of hotels this includes, though she said it was small. She added that the this is just a first step.

"Once we we feel confident that our users are happy with the experience," she said, "we'll add more listings and eventually roll out booking functionality to tens of thousands of hotels."

Yelp began its foray into bookings in 2013, forging partnerships with companies like Delivery.com and Booker that have allowed it to process transactions for food delivery and spa appointments.

But other online companies are also increasing their booking capabilities. Thanks to its acquisition of La Fourchette, the user-review site TripAdvisor now accepts restaurant reservations. And earlier this year Priceline, which already books flights and hotels, bought the reservations site OpenTable, aiming to add restaurants to its offerings.

And another sign that the worlds of user-reviewed listings, bookings and online deals are increasingly colliding: Now Groupon is heading into Yelp's territory. On Wednesday it announced the launch of Pages, an online directory of individual businesses that will include user reviews.

 


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Dinner, a Movie and a Flight Out of Minneapolis

Photo Rendering of the screening room at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.Credit Architectural Alliance

At the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, a layover means more than just a long wait between flights. The airport has transformed its C Concourse into an "arts corridor," culminating next month with the opening of a screening room.

The lounge will include modular and cinema-style seating with multiple high-definition screens; rotating programs highlighting local filmmakers; and a collapsible stage for lectures or small performances.

"It's all about trying to create a corridor, a first gateway" to the city's arts and culture, said Robyne Robinson, the arts and culture director of the Airport Foundation MSP. "We want to make sure that when people get ofthe plane, they know there's a place they can go to and get to know us and get onto their flight and have a better understanding of what Minneapolis is, so that the next time they come through, they'll want to see some film, see some art."

Minneapolis's new screening room is not the first time an airport has offered films for its passengers, but it's the first of its kind in the United States, the Metropolitan Airports Commission's Melissa Scovronski said. Commercially run cinemas are available to passengers in Seoul's Incheon International Airport, and there's an IMAX theater in Hong Kong International Airport's Terminal 2. Changi Airport in Singapore opened the world's first in-airport theater in 1998, with a second built in 2008, officials there said. Both are free.

These opportunities for entertainment amid layovers are part of the transformation of airports, from places where people "flop down and have no sense of what's going on" to a hub for showcasing a region's people and opportunities, Ms. Robinson said. Information about films will be posted on the foundation's website, so travelers can learn more about what they're watching and even choose to arrive at the airport earlier for dinner and a movie, Ms. Robinson said.

A version of this article appears in print on 10/26/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: River Cruise: Deeper Into the Amazon.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: On Yelp, Reviews With a Side of Bookings

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 25 Oktober 2014 | 17.36

Yelp, the online user-review and ratings site of everything from restaurants to spas to churches, is entering the hotel-booking game.

On Tuesday, it announced a partnership with Hipmunk, a travel search engine that lets people browse flights and hotels by a combination of factors like pricing, layover duration and amenities. Hipmunk, already in partnerships with direct-booking sites like Getaroom and Hotels.com, now supports a small number of hotels on Yelp. Users will now be able to book hotel rooms through it, without ever leaving Yelp's site.

Rachel Walker, a Yelp spokeswoman, would not specify the number of hotels this includes, though she said it was small. She added that the this is just a first step.

"Once we we feel confident that our users are happy with the experience," she said, "we'll add more listings and eventually roll out booking functionality to tens of thousands of hotels."

Yelp began its foray into bookings in 2013, forging partnerships with companies like Delivery.com and Booker that have allowed it to process transactions for food delivery and spa appointments.

But other online companies are also increasing their booking capabilities. Thanks to its acquisition of La Fourchette, the user-review site TripAdvisor now accepts restaurant reservations. And earlier this year Priceline, which already books flights and hotels, bought the reservations site OpenTable, aiming to add restaurants to its offerings.

And another sign that the worlds of user-reviewed listings, bookings and online deals are increasingly colliding: Now Groupon is heading into Yelp's territory. On Wednesday it announced the launch of Pages, an online directory of individual businesses that will include user reviews.

 


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Getting Acrobatic at Club Med

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 24 Oktober 2014 | 17.36

Photo The Club Med in Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic.Credit Club Med

On the cusp of establishing its first permanent production in Mexico in November, Cirque du Soleil has announced its next act: partnering with Club Med resorts to train guests in acrobatics, theater arts and dance.

In June 2015, Club Med Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic will be the site of the partnership's first Creactive  program, including a big-top-style circus tent where guests at the all-inclusive resort can learn the kinds of tricks seen in Cirque shows, including acrobatic bungee, aerial silks, tightrope walking and double trapeze.

For the younger or less daring, the resort will offer juggling, mask painting, unicycling and percussion.

Plans also include a redesigned outdoor play space, swapping a standard basketball court, for example, with multiple hoops for improvised games.

The partnership, in which Cirque du Soleil will oversee and train resort staff, expands on Club Med's 25-year tradition of offering the flying trapeze at many of its resorts.

The goal is "to bring it to another level," said Xavier Mufraggi, chief executive of Club Med North America.

Club Med plans to expand the circus arts program to another five properties within two years.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: On Vieques, a Yoga Retreat

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 23 Oktober 2014 | 17.36

Photo Tara Stiles on Vieques.Credit W Retreat & Spa

W Retreat & Spa on Vieques Island in Puerto Rico is offering Energize by Tara Stiles, the first program in the property's new Fit Retreat initiative for more health-focused getaways.

As part of Ms. Stiles's partnership with W, the high-profile New York yogi created a program for the resort where guests can practice yoga with Ms. Stiles or other teachers trained in her Strala Yoga style.

The customized three-day or five-day programs incorporate yoga sessions, outdoor activities like kayaking and snorkeling, and healthy meals, many of which were inspired by Ms. Stiles' cookbook, "Make Your Own Rules Diet," scheduled to be published next month.

Prices start at $609 nightly per person, exclusive of daily resort fee and tax.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A New Short Film, Starring James Franco, From the Artist Daniel Arsham

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 21 Oktober 2014 | 17.35

The new collaboration between the two talents depicts the end of the world as they know it.

Photo
The artist Daniel Arsham (right) and the actor James Franco on set.Credit James Law

When Daniel Arsham had doomsday visions, he didn't stockpile survival gear or scurry off to the nearest bunker. Instead, the New York-based artist wrote nine short screenplays, which together form one story about life after humanity's ill-fated attempt to save the planet from ecological disaster. The "Future Relic" series crystallized when he began exhibiting casts of everyday objects made to resemble archaeological finds (eroding laptops and cellphones, for instance, made from volcanic ash and plaster). The second chapter in Arsham's saga, "Future Relic 02," features a worker played by James Franco who spends his days underground indexing and destroying objects from the civilization that was. Shot over four days in Arsham's Brooklyn studio, the project — which makes its world premiere here — is just a taste of what the Miami native plans to screen at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival. As for Franco, he could easily relate to Arsham's vision. "I try to look at the world as a repository of antiquated artifacts and experiences," he says, "all of them worth preserving."

The world premiere of Daniel Arsham's film "Future Relic 02," starring James Franco.

danielarsham.com


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: What’s New in the French and Swiss Alps

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 20 Oktober 2014 | 17.35

Photo Courchevel in France, part of Les Trois Vallées, where you can dive under a frozen lake.Credit Patrick Pachod

France claims the world's largest ski resorts; Switzerland claims it created winter tourism, and will celebrate 150 years of snow play in 2015.

Both countries aim to encourage Americans to visit the Alps this winter, not just for seemingly endless runs and riveting views, but for novel attractions including ice-diving, ski-jogging and suspension-bridge-hiking.

Les Trois Vallées in France, one of the largest ski areas, encompassing 380 miles of interconnected runs, recently introduced the world's highest zipline at 3,230 meters (10,597 feet), effectively a unique ski lift stringing one peak to another.

This winter it will introduce ice-diving,scuba diving below the frozen surface of Lac du Lou, and "jogging on skis," after-hours uphill hikes followed by ski runs down. In the 3 Vallées town of St.-Martin-Bellevue, novices will be able to try the winter sport of biathlon with the French Olympic medalist Vincent Jay as the instructor; participants will use air rifles for target shooting on a cross-country ski course.

Opening in December, the area's 384-room Club Med Val Thorens Sensations will offer all-inclusive stays with meals, lift passes and ski instruction from $1,399 person for seven nights.

But it's Switzerland that says itinvented winter tourism in the Alps in the Graubünden region, where in thewinter of 1894-95 visitors first came to Davos for the clean frigid air, and thehotelier Johannes Badrutt wagered English tourists that if they stayed the winter and didn't enjoy it, he would pay their way (they did, and he didn't).

Events are in the planning stages, but Alpine resorts from Andermatt to Zermatt have added new hotels, and new lifts now link the Arosa and Lenzerheide ski areas for a combined 225 kilometers (140 miles) of runs. In the ski village of Les Diablerets, a new 170-foot-long suspension bridge known as Peak Walk at the Glacier 3000 ski resort will offer access to hikers year-round at over 9,800 feetwhen it opens in November. 

A version of this article appears in print on 10/19/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Trending: What's New in the French and Swiss Alps.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Pas de Rooms

While pirouettes and grand jetés may not get a porter to your room any faster, a little basic ballet training might improve their grace upon arrival. At least that's what JW Marriott is hoping will come of a new employee training program it has developed in partnership with the Joffrey Ballet in New York.

The hotel's Poise and Grace Program is a series of video tutorials led by the Joffrey's artistic director, Ashley Wheater. In them, Mr. Wheater demonstrates core movements and mind-sets practiced by professional dancers in order to achieve the seamless flow of a ballet sequence.

The training focuses on four areas: warming up the body, proper breathing techniques, the flow of movement and a connection with the audience. In essence, to think and act as if they were on stage- or perhaps in a Wes Anderson film.

"In ballet, we learn to foster self-confidence and to make a genuine connection with those around us, which are crucial skills for anyone in hospitality," Mr. Wheater said in an email. "Through proper technique and practice, those elements become second nature so that each person in the hotel has the foundation to approach guest interactions in a thoughtful and fluid way."

The exercises take between five and 15 minutes to perform, teaching posture, eye contact and proper breathing. They are meant to be an inspirational tool to any employee, no matter their job, Mitzi Gaskins, the global brand manager of JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts, said.

"It's remarkable how seamlessly the mannerisms that come so naturally to trained dancers translate from the stage to the hotel floor," she said.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: What’s New in the French and Swiss Alps

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 19 Oktober 2014 | 17.35

Photo Courchevel in France, part of Les Trois Vallées, where you can dive under a frozen lake.Credit Patrick Pachod

France claims the world's largest ski resorts; Switzerland claims it created winter tourism, and will celebrate 150 years of snow play in 2015.

Both countries aim to encourage Americans to visit the Alps this winter, not just for seemingly endless runs and riveting views, but for novel attractions including ice-diving, ski-jogging and suspension-bridge-hiking.

Les Trois Vallées in France, one of the largest ski areas, encompassing 380 miles of interconnected runs, recently introduced the world's highest zipline at 3,230 meters (10,597 feet), effectively a unique ski lift stringing one peak to another.

This winter it will introduce ice-diving,scuba diving below the frozen surface of Lac du Lou, and "jogging on skis," after-hours uphill hikes followed by ski runs down. In the 3 Vallées town of St.-Martin-Bellevue, novices will be able to try the winter sport of biathlon with the French Olympic medalist Vincent Jay as the instructor; participants will use air rifles for target shooting on a cross-country ski course.

Opening in December, the area's 384-room Club Med Val Thorens Sensations will offer all-inclusive stays with meals, lift passes and ski instruction from $1,399 person for seven nights.

But it's Switzerland that says itinvented winter tourism in the Alps in the Graubünden region, where in thewinter of 1894-95 visitors first came to Davos for the clean frigid air, and thehotelier Johannes Badrutt wagered English tourists that if they stayed the winter and didn't enjoy it, he would pay their way (they did, and he didn't).

Events are in the planning stages, but Alpine resorts from Andermatt to Zermatt have added new hotels, and new lifts now link the Arosa and Lenzerheide ski areas for a combined 225 kilometers (140 miles) of runs. In the ski village of Les Diablerets, a new 170-foot-long suspension bridge known as Peak Walk at the Glacier 3000 ski resort will offer access to hikers year-round at over 9,800 feetwhen it opens in November. 

A version of this article appears in print on 10/19/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Trending: What's New in the French and Swiss Alps.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A New Bike Tour of Eastern Germany

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 18 Oktober 2014 | 17.35

Photo Dresden, the final stop on the tour.Credit VBT Bicycling and Walking Vacations

"Berlin to Dresden: Hidden Gems of Eastern Germany," a new trip for 2015 from VBT Bicycling and Walking Vacations, features connections with local residents, a lesson in sauerkraut making, and wine sampling at a local vineyard. Bicycling routes follow easy terrain with optional rolling hills

Stops along the way include the landscaped gardens of Potsdam's Sanssouci Park and palace; the wetlands and waterways of the Spreewald, a Unesco biosphere reserve; and a trip to the sandstone peaks of the Bastei, in Saxon Switzerland National Park.

The tour concludes in Dresden, which travelers will explore on a walking tour.

This 10-day itinerary starts at $3,745 including international air fare. Add-ons include a pre-trip to Berlin and a post-trip to Prague.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More
Techie Blogger