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In Transit Blog: Rumblings of Volcanic Activity in Iceland

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 23 Agustus 2014 | 17.35

Photo A warning sign on a road near the Bardarbunga volcano in Iceland.Credit Reuters

The Icelandic Meteorological Office has warned airlines of heightening seismic activity near the Bardarbunga volcano, which lies under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland.

On Monday, the office, which is responsible for monitoring natural hazards, raised the volcano's status level from green, which indicates no eruptive activity, to orange, which indicates a heightened and escalating unrest in the volcano with a possible chance of eruption.

(Orange is the fourth of a five-level system used by the International Civil Aviation Organization to warn airlines of any seismic activity.)

Beginning Aug. 16, small continuous earthquakes were measured in two "swarms," one east of the volcano's caldera and another at the glacier's northeast border, a statement from the office said. Early Monday morning, an eruption in the northeast reached a 4.5 magnitude level, the strongest in the area since 1996, and prompted the office to raise the volcano's status and issue the warning.

"As evidence of magma movement shallower than 10 kilometers (6 miles) implies increased potential of a volcanic eruption, the Bardarbunga aviation color code has been changed to orange," the statement said. "Presently there are no signs of eruption, but it cannot be excluded that the current activity will result in an explosive subglacial eruption, leading to an outburst flood (jokulhlaup) and ash emission."

Earthquakes reaching a magnitude of 3 or less continued throughout the week. On Wednesday, an intrusion about 15 miles long had formed about three miles beneath the nearby Dyngjujokull Glacier, and Iceland's National Crisis Coordination Center had been activated to prepare for a possible eruption.

On Thursday a joint daily status report from the meteorological office and the University of Iceland's Institute of Earth Sciences said that measurements to date did not suggest that an eruption was imminent.

"Previous intrusion events in Iceland have lasted for several days or weeks, often not resulting in an eruption," the report said. "However an eruption of Bardarbunga cannot presently be excluded, hence the intense monitoring and preparation efforts."

Friday's status report noted a 4.7 magnitude earthquake that was measured in the Bardarbunga caldera Thursday night and said there was no sign of the seismic activity decreasing.

Icelandair does not anticipate any flight disruptions at this time, Michael Raucheisen, a marketing and communications coordinator for the airline, said in an email on Wednesday.

"We are closely monitoring the situation and will advise of any schedule changes should they occur," Mr. Raucheisen said. "Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are commonplace in our network hub of Iceland, but in case an event does occur, contingency plans are in place to deal with any potential outcome."

In 2010, ash and debris from Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland disrupted flights in Europe for almost a week, stranding passengers and causing billions of dollars in loss for airlines.

But while an eruption at Bardarbunga would also have the potential to disrupt flights, the biggest issue would be flooding.

"The risk of any disruptive ash cloud similar to the one in 2010 would depend on how high any ash would be thrown, how much there would be and how fine-grained it would be," Martin Hensch, a seismologist at the Met Office, told The Guardian newspaper. But the biggest problem for Iceland, he said, would be flooding caused by an eruption under the glacier.

"We've known for some time that Bardarbunga was going to do something – we just didn't know what," Dave McGarvie, a volcanologist at the Open University in Edinburgh, Scotland, said in a statement. "The good news for air travel is that both these clusters are away from the heart of the main volcano, as it's in the heart that the kind of magma is produced which leads to highly explosive eruptions that produce the abundant fine ash capable of being transported long distances through the atmosphere."

Bardarbunga's last eruption was in 1797.


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In Transit Blog: More Space for Pottery at Minnesota Museum

Photo Sow and piglets in Red Wing.Credit Pottery Museum of Red Wing

The Pottery Museum of Red Wing in Minnesota more than quadrupled its space this summer when it opened a new 13,000-square-foot facility showcasing a wide range of pottery and stoneware produced in the town.

The Red Wing Stoneware Company began making products in the late 1870s. Pots, crocks, dishware, cookware, vases and other mostly functional items made there are still sought after by collectors.

Production ended in 1967 and resumed in the 1980s.

The museum, owned and maintained by the Red Wing Collectors Society Foundation, includes a research center, a classroom and a gift shop, where visitors can purchase collectible items donated to the museum. Also on display are memorabilia, vintage photographs and products related to the industry. Admission is free.

The building anchors a rejuvenated Historic Pottery District that includes restaurants, shops and a brewery. Tours of the Red Wing Stoneware Company are available.


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In Transit Blog: Rumblings of Volcanic Activity in Iceland

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 22 Agustus 2014 | 17.36

Photo A warning sign on a road near the Bardarbunga volcano in Iceland.Credit Reuters

The Icelandic Meteorological Office has warned airlines of heightening eruptive activity near the Bardarbunga volcano, which lies under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland.

On Monday, the office, which is responsible for monitoring natural hazards, raised the volcano's status level from green, which indicates no eruptive activity, to orange, which indicates a heightened and escalating unrest in the volcano with a possible chance of eruption.

(Orange is the fourth of a five-level system used by the International Civil Aviation Organization to warn airlines of any seismic activity.)

Beginning Aug. 16, small continuous eruptions were measured in two "swarms," one east of the volcano's caldera and another at the glacier's northeast border, a statement from the office said. Early Monday morning, an eruption in the northeast reached a 4.5 magnitude level, the strongest in the area since 1996, and prompted the office to raise the volcano's status and issue the warning.

"As evidence of magma movement shallower than 10 kilometers (6 miles) implies increased potential of a volcanic eruption, the Bardarbunga aviation color code has been changed to orange," the statement said. "Presently there are no signs of eruption, but it cannot be excluded that the current activity will result in an explosive subglacial eruption, leading to an outburst flood (jokulhlaup) and ash emission."

Eruptions reaching a magnitude of 3 or less continued throughout the week. On Wednesday, an intrusion about 15 miles long had formed about three miles beneath the nearby Dyngjujokull Glacier, and Iceland's National Crisis Coordination Center had been activated to prepare for a possible eruption.

On Thursday a joint daily status report from the meteorological  office and the University of Iceland's Institute of Earth Sciences said that measurements to date did not suggest that an eruption was imminent.

"Previous intrusion events in Iceland have lasted for several days or weeks, often not resulting in an eruption," the report said. "However an eruption of Bardarbunga cannot presently be excluded, hence the intense monitoring and preparation efforts."

Icelandair does not anticipate any flight disruptions at this time, Michael Raucheisen, a marketing and communications coordinator for the airline, said in an email on Wednesday.

"We are closely monitoring the situation and will advise of any schedule changes should they occur," Mr. Raucheisen said. "Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are commonplace in our network hub of Iceland, but in case an event does occur, contingency plans are in place to deal with any potential outcome."

In 2010, ash and debris from Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland disrupted flights in Europe for almost a week, stranding passengers and causing billions of dollars in loss for airlines.

But while an eruption at Bardarbunga would also have the potential to disrupt flights, the biggest issue would be flooding.

"The risk of any disruptive ash cloud similar to the one in 2010 would depend on how high any ash would be thrown, how much there would be and how fine-grained it would be," Martin Hensch, a seismologist at the Met Office, told The Guardian newspaper. But the biggest problem for Iceland, he said, would be flooding caused by an eruption under the glacier.

"We've known for some time that Bardarbunga was going to do something – we just didn't know what," Dave McGarvie, a volcanologist at the Open University in Edinburgh, Scotland, said in a statement. "The good news for air travel is that both these clusters are away from the heart of the main volcano, as it's in the heart that the kind of magma is produced which leads to highly explosive eruptions that produce the abundant fine ash capable of being transported long distances through the atmosphere."

Bardarbunga's last eruption was in 1797.


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T Magazine: The L.A. Art Invasion

Written By wartini cantika on Rabu, 20 Agustus 2014 | 17.36

Sun-soaked isolation seems just the thing to spark inspiration.

Photo
From left: Sam Falls at Hannah Hoffman Gallery, "Untitled (Venice, Palm 4)," 2014. Jordan Wolfson at David Zwirner, "(Female Figure)," 2014.Credit Right: courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

When Thomas Demand and Ryan Trecartin relocated to Los Angeles in 2010, they added momentum to the city's burgeoning status as an art capital to rival New York, London and Berlin. Of course, its abundant light and space have always drawn a certain kind of artist — members of the Light and Space movement, for instance, like Bruce Nauman and James Turrell. But now, with new gallery neighborhoods in Hollywood and Downtown, the endless expansion of LACMA and the impending arrival of the esteemed FIAC art fair, it seems that everyone, major figures and young guns alike, wants to call L.A. home. In the past two years, David Benjamin Sherry, Sam Falls, Gabriel Kuri, Silke Otto-Knapp, Amalia Ulman and Jordan Wolfson have relocated to the Southland, while others, like Liz Craft and Amy Yao, have returned, choosing its sprawl over more cosmopolitan art meccas.

L.A.'s appeal lies in "the possibility of disappearing," says Ulman, an Argentine who previously worked in London and Spain. "I'm so autonomous here," Wolfson adds. "I have my studio, my house and my small life." Both artists create work that explores isolation: Ulman shoots selfies in airplane bathrooms and five-star hotels; Wolfson's scantily clad robotic dancer at David Zwirner caused a sensation this spring. "In L.A., artists can test things out without the glare of the spotlight," says Ali Subotnik, a curator at the Hammer Museum, who moved from New York in 2006. "The proximity to the entertainment industry guarantees that the art world will never be the main industry in this town, so artists are able to work on the sidelines." Anonymity has become its appeal: Like no other place, L.A. offers artists the ability to be alone, together.

A Primer on L.A.'s New Arrivals

Photo
Liz Craft, "After Dark," 2014.Credit Courtesy of the artist and Nathalie Karg

Liz Craft
Arrived from: New York City
L.A. gallery: none
Style: Craft's fantastical, dreamlike sculptures often veer in the direction of nightmares: they include glossy, upended spiders, functionless house-like constructions, goopy unicorns, baby carriages and assorted monsters.

Sam Falls
Arrived from: New York City
L.A. gallery: Hannah Hoffman Gallery
Style: Falls creates sculptures and paintings that he exposes to the elements, then takes photos of them to document how they change over weeks, months and sometimes years.

Photo
Gabriel Kuri at Regen Projects, "Credit Becomes Retail," 2014.Credit Brian Forrest, courtesy of Regen Projects, Los Angeles

Gabriel Kuri
Arrived from: Brussels
L.A. gallery: Regen Projects
Style: Kuri's playful sculptures repurpose materials from the manmade and natural worlds, combining them into forms that frequently comment on the role of commodities in society.

Photo
Silke Otto-Knapp at Gavin Brown's Enterprise, "Stage With Boats (blue and silver)," 2013.Credit Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown's Enterprise

Silke Otto-Knapp
Arrived from: Vienna
L.A. gallery: none (shows with Gavin Brown's Enterprise in New York)
Style: Otto-Knapp applies soft, ethereal layers of gouache and watercolor to produce muted representations of performance and place.

Photo
David Benjamin Sherry at Salon 94, "Climate Vortex Sutra," 2014.Credit Courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York

David Benjamin Sherry
Arrived from: New York City
L.A. gallery: OHWOW
Style: Sherry photographs grandiose American landscapes and tweaks them with vivid, monochromatic tints.

Photo
Amalia Ulman at LTD Los Angeles, from left, "Catastrophe #1," "Catastrophe #2" and "Catastrophe #3."Credit

Amalia Ulman
Arrived from: London and Gijon, Spain
L.A. gallery: LTD Los Angeles
Style: Ulman has riffed on contemporary decorations: Ikea paintings, aphorisms spelled out in romantic scripts and those wavy willows people stuff into vases. Lately, she has also documented cosmetic procedures via social media.

Jordan Wolfson
Arrived from: New York City
L.A. gallery: none (David Zwirner in New York and Sadie Coles HQ in London)
Style: Wolfson makes films, videos and installations that merge a cartoonish love for aesthetic variety (and cartoons themselves) with an underlying nihilism. This year, his animatronic stripper wearing a witch mask has become an art-world lightning rod.

Photo
Amy Yao at 47 Canal, "Skeleton, no. 2 (basic needs and the right to the pursuit of a good life)," 2013.Credit Joerg Lohse, courtesy of 47 Canal, New York

Amy Yao
Arrived from: New York City
L.A. gallery: none (Canal 47 in New York)
Style: Yao's work spans virtually all mediums: painting, sculpture, photography, performance. But it's her objects — umbrellas adorned in funereal garb or a top hat and sequins; folding fans with attached pearls or cigarettes; brightly colored sticks with equally brightly colored hair extensions — that offer a through-line in their crooked anthropomorphic qualities, suggesting serious jokes about contemporary life.


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T Magazine: The Weekly Agenda | A Mission Chinese Chef Pops up in Copenhagen, the FYF Fest in Los Angeles and More From the Cultural Calendar

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 19 Agustus 2014 | 17.36

T's list of things to see and do in the week ahead.

Photo
Events taking place this week include a Copenhagen pop-up preview of Pink Zebra SF, the new restaurant by the former Mission Chinese San Francisco chef Jesse Koide (left); and the "Whiteface" exhibition at LVL 3 Gallery in Chicago, featuring Stephen Collier's "Untitled (OK)," 2014 (right).Credit Left: Angela Decenzo

Monday, Melbourne
Shop for cutting-edge Australian fashion
The young Australian fashion star Dion Lee opened a second stand-alone retail shop, called Site 02, for his women's collection at the Emporium Melbourne last week. Explore the new space's minimalist setup and unique mirror arrangements while browsing the brand's angular, tech-influenced wares.
287 Lonsdale St., Melbourne, Australia, emporiummelbourne.com.au

Monday, Copenhagen
Eat at a Mission Chinese chef's Japanese-Mediterranean pop-up
Jesse Koide stepped down as head chef at Mission Chinese Food in San Francisco, but he's about to delve into fusion cooking again in Copenhagen. Described as Japanese-Mediterranean, Pink Zebra SF will open from Monday to Saturday in an exclusive preview. The six-day run ends just as the MAD symposium — an annual two-night culinary festival which brings chefs, foodies and food journalists to Denmark's capital — begins.
Pink Zebra SF will take over the Bento Izakaya restaurant from Aug. 18 to Aug. 23; Helgolandsgade 16, 1656 Copenhagen V, pinkzebrasf.com

Tuesday, New York
See art that promotes Tibet's legacy and culture
As the only studio in the Western world dedicated to preserving Tibetan art, the New York Tibetan Art Studio's inaugural group exhibition at Active Space in Brooklyn, called "New Voices," provides a rare platform for visitors to survey an even rarer culture's creative traditions. The 27 artists on show worked beneath, or were selected by, the Tibetan painter Pema Rinzin, whose cloth-based Thangka paintings have garnered praise from notable figures like the Dalai Lama.
Runs until Sept. 7, 566 Johnson Ave., Brooklyn, activespacestudios.com

Photo
The curators Adrian Schiesser and April Gertler of Sonntag Berlin, which will exhibit the works of Ignacio Uriarte this Sunday at Schiesser's apartment and serve the artist's favorite dessert.Credit Frank Herfort

Thursday, London
Party with photographers in Soho
Celebrating the release of its new Petzval lens, Lomography, the international analog film community and camera distributor, is hosting a launch party at its Soho gallery store in western London. Guests are encouraged to bring their cameras and test out the new lens, all while drinking champagne and mingling to the music of folk singer Denai Moore.
6 p.m. to 9 p.m, 3 Newburgh St., London, lomography.com

Thursday (and Friday), San Francisco
Watch a dance performance about a minority culture's experience
Through choreography, Kevin Williamson's The Lost Boys explores the challenges of being gay and young in the '80s, an era when HIV and AIDS acted as fodder for homophobia. In it, four male dancers blend performance art with dance in an erratic give-and-take, where tension and insecurity are revealed through each dancer's own physical catharsis.
Aug. 21 at 8 p.m. and Aug. 22 at 10 p.m., 1310 Mission St., San Francisco, counterpulse.org

Friday, Los Angeles
Catch FYF Fest's pre-festival parties
FYF Fest began as a humble micro-festival in 2004, when 14 bands first performed beneath its banner at a few keystone music venues across Los Angeles. Now, as evidenced by this year's headliners, the Strokes and Phoenix, it has grown into one of the West Coast's most anticipated music outings. If you didn't get tickets in time, there are still a handful of FYF-related events going on around town, like How to Dress Well at the Echoplex, and Slint at the El Rey, both on Friday.
The Echoplex, 1822 W. Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, theecho.com; El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, theelrey.com

Saturday, Chicago
Check out up-and-coming artists from New Orleans and Los Angeles
LVL 3 Gallery in Chicago's newest exhibition, "Whiteface," debuts next weekend with works by the artists Stephen Collier and Ben Sanders. Collier's work condenses the spirit of graffiti art into his deadpan "Brick Wall Portraits," while Sanders's art approaches a kind of ironic, pop-y gaudiness, yet is ultimately far too fascinating to ignite distaste.
Opening reception from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.; 1542 N. Milwaukee Ave., 3rd Floor, Chicago, lvl3media.com.

Sunday, Berlin
Visit a homey art space, and try an artist's favorite dessert
As part of the first Project Space Festival, an independent art space showcase in Berlin which runs until Aug. 31, the gallery Sonntag Berlin is hosting the ultra-minimalist works of Ignacio Uriarte. Sonntag's approach to the art world is homey and unique: On the third Sunday of every month, the curators April Gertler and Adrian Schiesser exhibit works by a selected artist in Schiesser's apartment, where they also bake and serve visitors the artist's favorite cake, pie or dessert.
Aug. 17 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Gossowstrasse 10, 10777, Berlin, sonntagberlin.tumblr.com.


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T Magazine: All Across America, Artists Are Taking Over Billboards

Photo
Kay Rosen's "Blurred" billboard, lit up along Interstate 70 as part of the "I-70 Sign Show."Credit Anne Thompson

"Visual pollution. Sky trash. Litter on a stick. The junk mail of the American highway." That's how billboards are described on the website of Scenic America, a group devoted to "preserving and enhancing the visual character" of the country. But while preservationists deride the billboard, artists have long been intrigued by it for its role in American highway culture. (Besides, what artist wouldn't want a 300-square-foot canvas with a guaranteed audience?)

While artists have been using billboards since the 1960s, there's been a recent resurgence of interest in road-sign art. A number of independently organized billboard projects have cropped up over the past several years, appearing everywhere from Florida to California. The artist Anne Thompson has organized one such project, up now: the Missouri-based "I-70 Sign Show." She suggests that billboards have gained in popularity in the context of art because they "look like a quaint, outmoded medium in the digital world. In terms of art history, when communication mediums lose their functional currency, they tend to get picked up and re-examined by artists."

Here, four projects that can be seen around the country:

Photo
A piece by Mickalene Thomas that is going up this week as part of the "I-70 Sign Show."Credit

"I-70 Sign Show"

Anne Thompson's project brings artworks to I-70 — a highway that (in Thompson's words) "conjures ideas of the cross-country road trip" but that also features politically charged billboards bought by interest groups whose messages reflect an intriguing "culture-wars roadside debate." A new billboard by the artist Mickalene Thomas will be unveiled this week. Featuring two women seated against a backdrop of patchwork patterns, the piece examines appearance and female sexuality.


Photo
Hannah Whitaker's "Nose (Bomberg)" hangs by an overpass as part of the "Big Pictures" project for the Cincinnati Art Museum.Credit

"Big Pictures"

Organized by the curator Brian Sholis, "Big Pictures" plays out on road signs across Cincinnati. The project, which is sponsored by the Cincinnati Art Museum, focuses on photographs by artists like Lorenzo Vitturi and Dawoud Bey and seeks to inspire "creative interruptions of daily routines." A recent photo by artist Sara Cwynar, up until Sept. 21, features an image of a toucan perched in a canopy of leaf-green Post-it notes, riffing on both the visual punning of ad imagery and on the office culture that's no doubt familiar to the commuters most often targeted by billboards.


Photo
A rendering of Times Square adorned with "Phil" by Chuck Close and "Nighthawks" by Edward Hopper for the "Art Everywhere" project.Credit Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and the Art Institute of Chicago

"Art Everywhere"

Billed as "the largest art show ever conceived," "Art Everywhere" brings 58 noteworthy artworks to prominent spots across the country. (The New York Times covered it last spring.) The public was allowed to cast their votes for the featured works, which were drawn from a shortlist of 100 pieces owned by institutions like the Whitney Museum and the Dallas Museum of Art. (Edward Hopper's "Nighthawks" proved most popular.) The project's decision to democratize content is an intriguing one, since billboard viewers almost never have a say in what they see.


Photo
A detail from Shana Lutker's series "Onward and Upward," for "Manifest Destiny," 2013.Credit

"The Manifest Destiny Billboard Trip"

Beginning last fall and ending in the spring of next year, 10 artists are installing their work along the Interstate 10 Freeway, which stretches from Florida to California. (T covered the project when it launched last fall.) The curators, Zoe Crosher and Shamim M. Momin, aim to question the problematic history of manifest destiny. Earlier this spring, Crosher and Momin's project inaugurated a series of road signs by the artist Sanford Biggers; the works reflect a journey Biggers took to northern Ethiopia, where the rapid construction of roads and highways is overtaking a traditionally nomadic lifestyle.


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In Transit Blog: Walkabout: Travel Industry Grapples with Smoking’s Shifting Winds

Photo Hotels and car rental companies grapple with the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes.Credit Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Walkabout

A weekly capsule of travel news curated by our writers and editors.

Lighting Up With the legalization of recreational marijuana use in some states and the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes, hotels and car rental companies struggle to deal with new trends in smoking. (The Washington Post)

Time Management Americans are taking fewer and shorter vacations. This graphic, depicting the decline since the late '70s, is shocking. (Vox)

Tagging, of a Different Sort For a tribe of outlaw Instagrammers, New York is a playground and battlefield. (NYMag.com)

Civilized Conveyance Cities that invest more in bike lanes save more in the long run, according to a new study. And some of those bike-friendly cities include Montreal, Berlin and  . . . Tokyo? (Fast Company; CNN)


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In Transit Blog: A New Cruise to Tasmania

Photo L'Austral, the Compagnie du Ponant boat.Credit Philip Plison

Tasmania, the Australian island about 150 miles south off the mainland, isn't the most frequented or easy to reach spot, but the French cruise line Compagnie du Ponant has a new excursion that gives travelers a chance to discover this remote destination.

The seven-night trip, which starts in Sydney and ends in Melbourne, is from Jan. 3 through 10 and follows in the footsteps of Abel Tasman, the Dutch explorer who discovered the island.

Stops along the way include Wineglass Bay on the east coast in the heart of the Freycinet National Park, considered one of the country's most beautiful natural environments, a place where visitors can take a walk through forest with a naturalist guide or go snorkeling in the sapphire waters.

A visit to Maria Island,  just off the east coast, is also on the itinerary: This former penal colony is now a national park and is known for its ocher sandstone cliffs, wild coastal landscapes and broad range of flora and fauna like the 40-spotted pardalote, a rare bird.

L'Austral is a 132-room small yacht-style boat and is from a company based in Marseille, France, that specializes in expeditions to less-traveled and far-flung ports.

It also has a reputation for its French-inspired cuisine. Instead of preset menus, chefs tend to shop for seafood and produce at local markets, and there is a dedicated pastry chef and bread baker on board. Prices start at 2,320 euros, about $3,015.


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In Transit Blog: A New Dive Center in Petit St. Vincent

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 18 Agustus 2014 | 17.36

Photo Diving in Petit St. Vincent.Credit Richard Murphy

Among a series of environmentally inspired changes, the private Caribbean island resort of Petit St. Vincent plans to add a dive center run by Jean-Michel Cousteau, son of the underwater explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, in November.

Jean-Michel Cousteau's Caribbean Divers will offer scuba instruction and outings to guests of the 22-cottage resort. Although it will operate as an independent commercial enterprise, the dive center will employ a marine biologist who will work closely with resort management to offer underwater tours as well as hikes around the island.

Both the resort and dive center plan to work together to lobby for a marine preserve near the 115-acre island in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Management of Petit St. Vincent has pledged to do its part to make the island more eco-friendly, with a two-year plan to install a retention pond that will naturally filter wastewater, to collect rainwater for irrigation, to compost green waste and to grow much of its own fruits and vegetables.


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In Transit Blog: Everyone Gets a Share, of Everything

The sharing economy — or the prospect of what's mine is yours, for a price — has hit nearly every sector of the travel market. The success of operations like Airbnb in room rentals has spawned businesses related to recreation, dining and transportation.

The new app from JetSmarter allows fliers to book a seat on a private jet from their smartphones, promising the same ease as using Uber to get a ride.

If you want a pontoon boat in Michigan, a sailboat in St. Thomas or a ski boat in the Ozarks, GetMyBoat, launched in 2013, rents more than 17,000 idle boats around the world (the company says most boat owners use their watercraft only 8 percent of the time).

EatWith, which began in 2013, links travelers with locals in 32 countries for a home-cooked meal.

Even traditional destination clubs, in which membership fees grant access to high-end estates in popular resort destinations, have begun sharing access with outsiders. Exclusive Resorts' Gateway Escape plan allows nonmembers access to its portfolio of more than 300 rental homes for three- to seven-day stays.

With both traditional and sharing options crowding the web, travel searches can be overwhelming, but the rise of metasearch engines — search sites that aggregate results from many sites and databases — suggests that the digital future may become more organized. Such sites as Kayak for airline travel and Trivago for hotel bookings already exist. But the new lodging search engine AllTheRooms rounds up not just available hotels in a place, but shareable options including home rentals and houseboats and nontraditional choices like campgrounds, making for easy cost and option comparisons across categories in one Google-like click.

"If there's a hammock in the Caribbean or a couch in Manhattan or a four-star hotel in Las Vegas, it will show up in AllTheRooms," said Joseph DiTomaso, co-founder and chief executive of AllTheRooms. "We give the consumer what they're looking for, access to everything."

A version of this article appears in print on 08/17/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Everyone Gets a Share, of Everything.


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