Diberdayakan oleh Blogger.

Popular Posts Today

In Transit Blog: An International Art Festival in the Azores

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 30 Juni 2014 | 17.36

Sao Miguel, one of the nine Azorean islands that huddle in the Atlantic, has long attracted visitors with its pastoral setting dotted with cows, waterfalls and volcanoes. But Ponta Delgada, the capital, is transforming into a center for the avant-garde with Walk & Talk, an annual international public art festival.

Held since 2011, the two-week event – the 2014 edition will run July 18 to Aug. 3 – brings an almost party-like atmosphere to the city streets.

This year, the celebrated street artist Alexandre Farto and emerging Madrid-based architect-designer Marlon de Azambuja will join 68 others from nine countries to create everything from murals and video, light and architectural installations, to poetry and dance performances in public spaces.

Set in an abandoned building next to Theater Micaelense, the Azores' principal theater, the Gallery is the festival's central gathering spot, hosting activities that include Azorean-directed films; a tile painting workshop led by the Portuguese designer Mafalda Fernandes; and a three-hour master class with Juliao Sarmento, one of Portugal's most notable contemporary artists. (Only the workshops and master classes come with a fee, around $27.) The space encourages interaction among artists, visitors and locals.

With map and app in hand, visitors can wander the city center, inspecting the current art projects as well as the 100 past installations decorating houses, the seaport, city walls and factory facades. (Guided tours in English and Portuguese are also available.) Most works are within walking distance but visitors can board minibuses for sights farther afield.

For more information: www.facebook.com/pages/WalkTalk/208225599200737?fref=ts).


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: An International Art Festival in the Azores

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 28 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Sao Miguel, one of the nine Azorean islands that huddle in the Atlantic, has long attracted visitors with its pastoral setting dotted with cows, waterfalls and volcanoes. But Ponta Delgada, the capital, is transforming into a center for the avant-garde with Walk & Talk, an annual international public art festival.

Held since 2011, the two-week event – the 2014 edition will run July 18 to Aug. 3 – brings an almost party-like atmosphere to the city streets.

This year, the celebrated street artist Alexandre Farto and emerging Madrid-based architect-designer Marlon de Azambuja will join 68 others from nine countries to create everything from murals and video, light and architectural installations, to poetry and dance performances in public spaces.

Set in an abandoned building next to Theater Micaelense, the Azores' principal theater, the Gallery is the festival's central gathering spot, hosting activities that include Azorean-directed films; a tile painting workshop led by the Portuguese designer Mafalda Fernandes; and a three-hour master class with Juliao Sarmento, one of Portugal's most notable contemporary artists. (Only the workshops and master classes come with a fee, around $27.) The space encourages interaction among artists, visitors and locals.

With map and app in hand, visitors can wander the city center, inspecting the current art projects as well as the 100 past installations decorating houses, the seaport, city walls and factory facades. (Guided tours in English and Portuguese are also available.) Most works are within walking distance but visitors can board minibuses for sights farther afield.

For more information: www.facebook.com/pages/WalkTalk/208225599200737?fref=ts).


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Biking by Day, Luxury by Night

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 27 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Cycling trips meet the glamping world in TerraVelo Tours, a new bike trip company pairing long distance-riding with overnights in mobile luxury camps.

Beginning in September, seven-day itineraries cover about 500 miles in the canyons of southern Utah, hitting Zion, Bryce, Arches and Canyonlands National Parks.

Limited to 12 riders per trip, the groups spend each evening in a camp with unexpected amenities including tents with Frette-linen-dressed beds and rugs underfoot, a lounge tent with a sofa and board games, a bar and mobile shower and toilet facilities.

Two full-time chefs provide meals, and evening entertainment may include live music, massage services or guided stargazing with a visiting astronomer.

"We've heard so many times from people, 'I love being outdoors and love adventure travel but at the end of the day I don't want to be in a sleeping bag on the ground,'" said Rebecca Martin, an events planner who co-founded TerraVelo with David Levine, an avid cyclist who has pedaled extensively in 61 countries.

Catering to couples or friends with potentially divergent interests, the trips offer two tracks: the "peloton" for riders who want to put in up to 100 miles each day, and "travelers" for cyclists spending a half a day on a bike, for roughly 20 to 35 miles, and the other half taking guided excursions such as hiking or horseback riding.

Trips cost $7,850 per person, double occupancy, including domestic round-trip airfare from 48 states and the use of a Specialized Roubaix Expert  bike with Ultegra gearing.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: In Brussels, a Colorful Floral Carpet

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 26 Juni 2014 | 17.35

A Turkish "carpet" measuring 246 feet long and 82 feet wide and made up of about 800,000 cut begonias will blanket Brussels' Grand Place, the city's main square, from Aug. 15 to 17. The biennial Brussels Flower Carpet, which combines art, architecture, and landscaping, this year celebrates the 50th anniversary of Turkish immigration in Belgium.

The blossoms, laid down by 120 volunteers just hours before the opening, are packed tightly one by one, about 30 to every square foot, with rolled turf filling in the spaces between the floral patterns. During dry spells, the carpet must be watered so the turf doesn't shrink. If it rains, the grass grows nearly two inches.

The event started in the early 1970s to showcase Belgium's famous export of begonias. The country is one of the world's largest producer of begonia tubers, cultivating some 60 million every year.

Visitors may admire the masterpiece at eye level on Grand Place and get a bird's-eye view from the balcony of City Hall. Tours run from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m., with light and sound shows every evening starting at 10. Admission is 5 euros, with free entry for children under 10. Tickets can be purchased in advance at www.flowercarpet.be.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: May I Mash Your Peas and Adjust Your Bib, Sir?

Written By wartini cantika on Rabu, 25 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Forget packing those small jars. The rise of family travel meets the trend of homemade baby food at a number of resorts, many of them in foreign destinations where parents may worry about food safety.

Earlier this year, when the chef Torsten Rumprecht joined Rosewood Little Dix Bay on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands, he began offering guests house-blended fruits and vegetables including pumpkin and pear purée and sweet potato mash with veal and broccoli, based on his experience making baby food for his daughter.

Also in the Caribbean, Hôtel Saint-Barth Isle de France on St. Barts recently introduced custom blends of vegetables, potatoes, fish and meat on its "Pour les Bébés" menu.

On Mexico's Riviera Maya, the Iberostar Paraíso Maya recently added a separate Babies Kitchen, including a refrigerator stocked with baby food made by the staff, and appliances like microwaves for parents who want to prepare their own fruits and vegetables from the pantry. A staff nutritionist is available for consultations.

Many hotels like El Fenn in Marrakesh and all Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, as well as Crystal Cruises, offer house-prepared baby food on request.

But, increasingly the smallest travelers are getting their own menus.

"Because we are in Central America, a lot of our clients with little kids were afraid of exposing them to bacteria they haven't been exposed to before," said Ruthy Ghitis, co-owner of Nayara Hotel, Spa & Gardens near Arenal Volcano in Costa Rica. The property began offering a baby's menu, using produce from the on-site organic garden, three years ago. "We were getting a lot of petitions to do something special," she said, "so we decided to do a simple menu to make it easier."

The kitchen concessions are a seeming boon to traveling families, though some parents suggest quizzing the chefs on their food sources before ordering those mashed peas.

"If I knew where the food was coming from, it might be better than schlepping your own food, which we were doing before," said Megy Karydes, a blogger at TravelingMom.com. "The bananas always get squashed in flight."


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Soccer, Bourbon and a Very Special Farm in Missouri

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

This was a tough week to be an Englishman, as my boys limped out of the World Cup with a defeat to Uruguay. Luckily, my spirits were only temporarily dampened, thanks to the incredible encounters I've been having in the South and Midwest.

In Bardstown, Ky., which calls itself the "Bourbon Capital of the World," I consumed ample amounts of the stuff with a gentleman named Colonel Michael Masters, a man who knows his bourbon. We rode up to his historic restaurant, Chapeze House, tired and thirsty. As he instructed us in the proper technique for tasting bourbon, he shared a story about hitching a ride from the Caribbean to Great Britain on a sailboat. When I thanked him for his Southern hospitality, he replied, "In American culture, you always take care of the traveler."

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Next, we met Pastor Bob Hardison and his wife, Violet, in the small town of Sebree, Ky. For 27 years, the couple has been welcoming cyclists, more than 200 a year, into their Sanctuary Sebree Church to sleep and wash. Violet, an incredible cook, welcomed me with the most refreshingly cold glass of iced tea I have ever tasted and cooked a mean breakfast the next morning, without charge. The Hardisons believe it to be a miracle that the Lord brought the world to their doorstep. I'm not a religious man, but if the Lord did have a hand in bringing me to the Hardisons, all I can say is, "Thank you!" It is hard not to be filled with their infectious energy and love. You leave feeling filled with more than just Violet's cooking.

Then there was the great Peter K. Delaney, who had worked as a janitor for 27 years and as a postman for the last 10. At his daughter's restaurant, Delaney's, in Goreville, Ill., he sat down beside me and said hello. What was supposed to be a quick meal turned into a four-hour lunch during which we discussed politics, food, healthcare, American history, his years in the navy as a radar operator and the love of his life, his wife Dorothy. As I stepped reluctantly back into the 92-degree afternoon, knowing I had another 30 miles to ride, he reminded me that "every day is summer!"

In Cape Girardeau, Mo., we visited Family Friendly Farm, run by Matt and Rachel Fasnacht. A former chemistry teacher with a Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry, Matt is now an independent farmer raising pigs, cows and chickens. His academic background is evident in the way he approaches farming. Matt practices management intensive rotational grazing, an approach to herd management discussed in Michael Pollan's "The Omnivore's Dilemma" that leads to healthier livestock and more nutritious products. His cows, all of whom have names, followed us as we walked the pastures. As they ate different grass varieties around the 50-acre, he explained the impact each one has on their milk.

Before I left, Matt and Rachel told a great story. This past winter was hard on many of us, but it was especially hard on Matt and Rachel. As the harsh Missouri winter raged on, sales flagged because the animals weren't producing as much, and they lost a few due to storms, resulting in additional meats in their freezer. So they began asking customers, some of whom drive as much as 100 miles for their raw milk and other natural products, if they could dig a little deeper into their pockets and buy an extra chicken or a dozen eggs for a neighbor. Everyone they asked did so. One anonymous fan even sent $1,000 with a note that read "from a very grateful customer." It shows how much people who have experienced the joy of naturally raised food come to value the people who produce it.

On Sunday, we'll stop in the great flat planes of Kansas to watch the World Cup again. With England out, this time I will be wearing my U.S.A. T-shirt with pride.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A New Guide to the Grand Canyon by Wheelchair

Wheelchair users might not think of the Grand Canyon as a place to visit comfortably, but the accessible-travel writer Candy Harrington says it can be done in "Barrier-Free Travel: The Grand Canyon for Wheelers and Slow Walkers."

The book highlights accessible trails, sites and lodging options on the north and south rims; includes access details about the Grand Canyon Railway; and provides hard-to-find access information about Grand Canyon West.

Although it is directed at travelers with mobility limitations, parents with stroller-age children may also appreciate the information on easy-to-maneuver walking paths and stair-free entrances.

Ms. Harrington also describes and photographs specific accessible rooms at the various park hotels, including the historic El Tovar and the adjacent and newer Kachina Lodge, which, she points out, is the only property in the park with an elevator.

For visitors touring by car, the guide provides directions to accessible walkways and restrooms at several popular park overlooks, and for those not wanting to drive, it includes a list of narrated bus tours equipped for wheelchairs.

For travelers who want to reach the bottom of the canyon but can't traverse the trail down to Phantom Ranch from the South Rim, Ms. Harrington shares information about the little-known 19.5-mile driving route to the bottom of the canyon, reached by traveling through land owned by the Hualapai Tribe.

A package deal is available that includes a picnic lunch, driving permit and overnight lodging at the Hualapai Lodge, where Ms. Harrington praises the accessible parking, level entrance and Room 117.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: In Vermont, a Festival of Cheese

More than 40 Vermont cheesemakers and dozens of specialty food, beer, wine, and spirits producers will gather on July 20 for the sixth annual Vermont Cheesemakers Festival in Shelburne, presented by the Vermont Cheese Council.

The event, which perennially sells out, will be held in the historic Coach Barn at Shelburne Farms, a scenic 1,400-acre nonprofit agricultural estate that maintains a working farm and inn on the shores of Lake Champlain.

Tasting, pairing and sampling events will be interspersed with cheesemaking and culinary demonstrations and workshops throughout the day, all included with the $50 admission.

Offerings include "Sweet & Stinky," an exploration of how the Green Mountain State's sweet wines, ice wines and ciders complement soft-ripened, washed rinds and smeared cheeses; Beyond the Curd, a look at how byproducts of cheesemaking can be used in cooking; and "A Vertical Tasting," where cheesemakers present cow, goat and sheep milk products.

In the demo kitchen, the brewmaster Will Gilson and the chef Steve Sicinski from Crop Bistro & Brewery in Stowe will be cooking with ales and cheese, while the educator and chef Sarah Langan from South End Kitchen at Lake Champlain Chocolates in Burlington will whip up dishes with chocolate and cheese.

If you miss out on the event, you can always hit the Vermont Cheese Trail, which lists 44 cheesemakers across the state, with a dozen open to the public.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A New, Eclectic Tour of Reykjavik

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 23 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Have a layover in Iceland, but not sure what to do? There's a new walking tour aimed at introducing travelers — particularly those on stopovers in Iceland — to the locals' side of Reykjavik.

Audur Osp, founder of the I Heart Reykjavik blog, recently began walking tours of the same name. Ms. Osp promises to show visitors a secret side of the city not found in guidebooks, while also introducing tourists to Icelandic history and culture.

"My blog, which I've been writing for three years now, is hugely popular because it offers real and honest information about traveling in Iceland in a humorous way," she said. "I've tried to use that as my guiding light with the tours, too."

Stops at Reykjavik's more well-known landmarks, such as Hallgrimskirkja Church, Arnarholl and the Einar Jonsson Sculpture Garden, are enthusiastically supported by historical tidbits about pirate kidnappings, self-proclaimed kings and art-inclined ravens.

"Locals-only" highlights could include a stroll through an off-the-map residential area to check out Reykjavik's burgeoning street art scene, or a visit to Puffin Coffee, a charity shop run out of a man's kitchen window. The itinerary is flexible depending on special requests or Iceland's unpredictable weather, she said.

The daily, two- to three-hour, small group tours (6000 Icelandic kronor per person, about $54,  or 5000 kronor, or $45, per person if reserved online) are licensed by the Icelandic Tourist Board, and are limited to 12 people. Private walking tours (29,000 or 25,000 kronor) and three- to four-hour private photo tours (35,000 kronor) also are available.

"My main objective is for people to feel like they know the city a bit better after they do my tour," Ms. Osp said. "I'm just someone who loves where they live and wants to share that love."

Reservations are available at www.tours.iheartreykjavik.net or by calling 354-854-4476.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: In Colorado, a Brewers’ Festival Toasts an Anniversary

The Colorado Brewers' Festival will celebrate its 25th anniversary this month in Fort Collins, Colo., a place where the thirst for craft beer is alive, kicking and growing. This year's festival brings 13 new breweries to the tasting tables, offering a total of close to 120 different brews, including its first group of hard ciders.

The annual All Brewer's Eve dinner and food-pairing ($60) gets things hopping on Friday night, June 27, with 20 different beers offered exclusively at the dinner, most of which have won medals at the Great American Beer Festival and World Beer Cup. That's followed by two days of drinking (or "tasting," as it's called in the industry) from a rotating list of more than 50 beers each day of the festival.

Those who want to get started early on Saturday can sign up for the first-ever festival brunch at the Mainline, an ale house and restaurant in Fort Collins ($40). Breakfast will be served with a selection of "morning-minded" beers, according to the organizers, after which participants will be led to the festival grounds by a brass band, where they will receive a commemorative glass and 10 festival bucks to spend on samples.

Also new this year will be the Colorado Brewers Guild's "beer school" and the Summit specialty brew tent, offering a series of educational seminars and meet-the-brewers opportunities, where guests can mingle with the makers.

To honor its 25th year, the festival's founders, Doug Odell of Odell Brewing and Brad Page, a founder of CooperSmith Pub and Brewery, have melded their talents to create an Anniversary Ale, a pale, dry, brew with a tart finish, they said, partly sourced from apple juice.

For the first festival, the only requirement was that participants brew beer in Colorado, Mr. Odell said on the phone from his brewery in Fort Collins. Attendees emptied around 35 half-barrels (or kegs) of beer that year, he said, compared with the estimated 540 kegs floated at last year's event.

"When we started, people thought beer was just that light American lager. It's really morphed; the growth of craft beers in Colorado is amazing," he said, noting that despite a few nonbeer ideas that organizers sneak in now and again (a chili cook-off one year and carnival rides in another), the festival has always remained a showcase for the flavors and the individuals who make them.

There will be some additional entertainment, provided by bands at the Base Camp stage, and outdoor activities like zip-lining and rock-climbing in the Wilderness area, a good opportunity for tasters to sweat out some of that malt before heading to the next tasting.

Entry is free; packages are available for tastings and special events. For details and passes, contact the Downtown Fort Collins Business Association: 970-484-6500; downtownfortcollins.com.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Soccer, Bourbon and a Very Special Farm in Missouri

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

This was a tough week to be an Englishman, as my boys limped out of the World Cup with a defeat to Uruguay. Luckily, my spirits were only temporarily dampened, thanks to the incredible encounters I've been having in the South and Midwest.

In Bardstown, Ky., which calls itself the "Bourbon Capital of the World," I consumed ample amounts of the stuff with a gentleman named Colonel Michael Masters, a man who knows his bourbon. We rode up to his historic restaurant, Chapeze House, tired and thirsty. As he instructed us in the proper technique for tasting bourbon, he shared a story about hitching a ride from the Caribbean to Great Britain on a sailboat. When I thanked him for his Southern hospitality, he replied, "In American culture, you always take care of the traveler."

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Next, we met Pastor Bob Hardison and his wife, Violet, in the small town of Sebree, Ky. For 27 years, the couple has been welcoming cyclists, more than 200 a year, into their Sanctuary Sebree Church to sleep and wash. Violet, an incredible cook, welcomed me with the most refreshingly cold glass of iced tea I have ever tasted and cooked a mean breakfast the next morning, without charge. The Hardisons believe it to be a miracle that the Lord brought the world to their doorstep. I'm not a religious man, but if the Lord did have a hand in bringing me to the Hardisons, all I can say is, "Thank you!" It is hard not to be filled with their infectious energy and love. You leave feeling filled with more than just Violet's cooking.

Then there was the great Peter K. Delaney, who had worked as a janitor for 27 years and as a postman for the last 10. At his daughter's restaurant, Delaney's, in Goreville, Ill., he sat down beside me and said hello. What was supposed to be a quick meal turned into a four-hour lunch during which we discussed politics, food, healthcare, American history, his years in the navy as a radar operator and the love of his life, his wife Dorothy. As I stepped reluctantly back into the 92-degree afternoon, knowing I had another 30 miles to ride, he reminded me that "every day is summer!"

In Cape Girardeau, Mo., we visited Family Friendly Farm, run by Matt and Rachel Fasnacht. A former chemistry teacher with a Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry, Matt is now an independent farmer raising pigs, cows and chickens. His academic background is evident in the way he approaches farming. Matt practices management intensive rotational grazing, an approach to herd management discussed in Michael Pollan's "The Omnivore's Dilemma" that leads to healthier livestock and more nutritious products. His cows, all of whom have names, followed us as we walked the pastures. As they ate different grass varieties around the 50-acre, he explained the impact each one has on their milk.

Before I left, Matt and Rachel told a great story. This past winter was hard on many of us, but it was especially hard on Matt and Rachel. As the harsh Missouri winter raged on, sales flagged because the animals weren't producing as much, and they lost a few due to storms, resulting in additional meats in their freezer. So they began asking customers, some of whom drive as much as 100 miles for their raw milk and other natural products, if they could dig a little deeper into their pockets and buy an extra chicken or a dozen eggs for a neighbor. Everyone they asked did so. One anonymous fan even sent $1,000 with a note that read "from a very grateful customer." It shows how much people who have experienced the joy of naturally raised food come to value the people who produce it.

On Sunday, we'll stop in the great flat planes of Kansas to watch the World Cup again. With England out, this time I will be wearing my U.S.A. T-shirt with pride.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A New, Eclectic Tour of Reykjavik

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 22 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Have a layover in Iceland, but not sure what to do? There's a new walking tour aimed at introducing travelers — particularly those on stopovers in Iceland — to the locals' side of Reykjavik.

Audur Osp, founder of the I Heart Reykjavik blog, recently began walking tours of the same name. Ms. Osp promises to show visitors a secret side of the city not found in guidebooks, while also introducing tourists to Icelandic history and culture.

"My blog, which I've been writing for three years now, is hugely popular because it offers real and honest information about traveling in Iceland in a humorous way," she said. "I've tried to use that as my guiding light with the tours, too."

Stops at Reykjavik's more well-known landmarks, such as Hallgrimskirkja Church, Arnarholl and the Einar Jonsson Sculpture Garden, are enthusiastically supported by historical tidbits about pirate kidnappings, self-proclaimed kings and art-inclined ravens.

"Locals-only" highlights could include a stroll through an off-the-map residential area to check out Reykjavik's burgeoning street art scene, or a visit to Puffin Coffee, a charity shop run out of a man's kitchen window. The itinerary is flexible depending on special requests or Iceland's unpredictable weather, she said.

The daily, two- to three-hour, small group tours (6000 Icelandic kronor per person, about $54,  or 5000 kronor, or $45, per person if reserved online) are licensed by the Icelandic Tourist Board, and are limited to 12 people. Private walking tours (29,000 or 25,000 kronor) and three- to four-hour private photo tours (35,000 kronor) also are available.

"My main objective is for people to feel like they know the city a bit better after they do my tour," Ms. Osp said. "I'm just someone who loves where they live and wants to share that love."

Reservations are available at www.tours.iheartreykjavik.net or by calling 354-854-4476.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: In Colorado, a Brewers’ Festival Toasts an Anniversary

The Colorado Brewers' Festival will celebrate its 25th anniversary this month in Fort Collins, Colo., a place where the thirst for craft beer is alive, kicking and growing. This year's festival brings 13 new breweries to the tasting tables, offering a total of close to 120 different brews, including its first group of hard ciders.

The annual All Brewer's Eve dinner and food-pairing ($60) gets things hopping on Friday night, June 27, with 20 different beers offered exclusively at the dinner, most of which have won medals at the Great American Beer Festival and World Beer Cup. That's followed by two days of drinking (or "tasting," as it's called in the industry) from a rotating list of more than 50 beers each day of the festival.

Those who want to get started early on Saturday can sign up for the first-ever festival brunch at the Mainline, an ale house and restaurant in Fort Collins ($40). Breakfast will be served with a selection of "morning-minded" beers, according to the organizers, after which participants will be led to the festival grounds by a brass band, where they will receive a commemorative glass and 10 festival bucks to spend on samples.

Also new this year will be the Colorado Brewers Guild's "beer school" and the Summit specialty brew tent, offering a series of educational seminars and meet-the-brewers opportunities, where guests can mingle with the makers.

To honor its 25th year, the festival's founders, Doug Odell of Odell Brewing and Brad Page, a founder of CooperSmith Pub and Brewery, have melded their talents to create an Anniversary Ale, a pale, dry, brew with a tart finish, they said, partly sourced from apple juice.

For the first festival, the only requirement was that participants brew beer in Colorado, Mr. Odell said on the phone from his brewery in Fort Collins. Attendees emptied around 35 half-barrels (or kegs) of beer that year, he said, compared with the estimated 540 kegs floated at last year's event.

"When we started, people thought beer was just that light American lager. It's really morphed; the growth of craft beers in Colorado is amazing," he said, noting that despite a few nonbeer ideas that organizers sneak in now and again (a chili cook-off one year and carnival rides in another), the festival has always remained a showcase for the flavors and the individuals who make them.

There will be some additional entertainment, provided by bands at the Base Camp stage, and outdoor activities like zip-lining and rock-climbing in the Wilderness area, a good opportunity for tasters to sweat out some of that malt before heading to the next tasting.

Entry is free; packages are available for tastings and special events. For details and passes, contact the Downtown Fort Collins Business Association: 970-484-6500; downtownfortcollins.com.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Soccer, Bourbon and a Very Special Farm in Missouri

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

This was a tough week to be an Englishman, as my boys limped out of the World Cup with a defeat to Uruguay. Luckily, my spirits were only temporarily dampened, thanks to the incredible encounters I've been having in the South and Midwest.

In Bardstown, Ky., which calls itself the "Bourbon Capital of the World," I consumed ample amounts of the stuff with a gentleman named Colonel Michael Masters, a man who knows his bourbon. We rode up to his historic restaurant, Chapeze House, tired and thirsty. As he instructed us in the proper technique for tasting bourbon, he shared a story about hitching a ride from the Caribbean to Great Britain on a sailboat. When I thanked him for his Southern hospitality, he replied, "In American culture, you always take care of the traveler."

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Next, we met Pastor Bob Hardison and his wife, Violet, in the small town of Sebree, Ky. For 27 years, the couple has been welcoming cyclists, more than 200 a year, into their Sanctuary Sebree Church to sleep and wash. Violet, an incredible cook, welcomed me with the most refreshingly cold glass of iced tea I have ever tasted and cooked a mean breakfast the next morning, without charge. The Hardisons believe it to be a miracle that the Lord brought the world to their doorstep. I'm not a religious man, but if the Lord did have a hand in bringing me to the Hardisons, all I can say is, "Thank you!" It is hard not to be filled with their infectious energy and love. You leave feeling filled with more than just Violet's cooking.

Then there was the great Peter K. Delaney, who had worked as a janitor for 27 years and as a postman for the last 10. At his daughter's restaurant, Delaney's, in Goreville, Ill., he sat down beside me and said hello. What was supposed to be a quick meal turned into a four-hour lunch during which we discussed politics, food, healthcare, American history, his years in the navy as a radar operator and the love of his life, his wife Dorothy. As I stepped reluctantly back into the 92-degree afternoon, knowing I had another 30 miles to ride, he reminded me that "every day is summer!"

In Cape Girardeau, Mo., we visited Family Friendly Farm, run by Matt and Rachel Fasnacht. A former chemistry teacher with a Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry, Matt is now an independent farmer raising pigs, cows and chickens. His academic background is evident in the way he approaches farming. Matt practices management intensive rotational grazing, an approach to herd management discussed in Michael Pollan's "The Omnivore's Dilemma" that leads to healthier livestock and more nutritious products. His cows, all of whom have names, followed us as we walked the pastures. As they ate different grass varieties around the 50-acre, he explained the impact each one has on their milk.

Before I left, Matt and Rachel told a great story. This past winter was hard on many of us, but it was especially hard on Matt and Rachel. As the harsh Missouri winter raged on, sales flagged because the animals weren't producing as much, and they lost a few due to storms, resulting in additional meats in their freezer. So they began asking customers, some of whom drive as much as 100 miles for their raw milk and other natural products, if they could dig a little deeper into their pockets and buy an extra chicken or a dozen eggs for a neighbor. Everyone they asked did so. One anonymous fan even sent $1,000 with a note that read "from a very grateful customer." It shows how much people who have experienced the joy of naturally raised food come to value the people who produce it.

On Sunday, we'll stop in the great flat planes of Kansas to watch the World Cup again. With England out, this time I will be wearing my U.S.A. T-shirt with pride.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A New, Eclectic Tour of Reykjavik

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 21 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Have a layover in Iceland, but not sure what to do? There's a new walking tour aimed at introducing travelers — particularly those on stopovers in Iceland — to the locals' side of Reykjavik.

Audur Osp, founder of the I Heart Reykjavik blog, recently began walking tours of the same name. Ms. Osp promises to show visitors a secret side of the city not found in guidebooks, while also introducing tourists to Icelandic history and culture.

"My blog, which I've been writing for three years now, is hugely popular because it offers real and honest information about traveling in Iceland in a humorous way," she said. "I've tried to use that as my guiding light with the tours, too."

Stops at Reykjavik's more well-known landmarks, such as Hallgrimskirkja Church, Arnarholl and the Einar Jonsson Sculpture Garden, are enthusiastically supported by historical tidbits about pirate kidnappings, self-proclaimed kings and art-inclined ravens.

"Locals-only" highlights could include a stroll through an off-the-map residential area to check out Reykjavik's burgeoning street art scene, or a visit to Puffin Coffee, a charity shop run out of a man's kitchen window. The itinerary is flexible depending on special requests or Iceland's unpredictable weather, she said.

The daily, two- to three-hour, small group tours (6000 Icelandic kronor per person, about $54,  or 5000 kronor, or $45, per person if reserved online) are licensed by the Icelandic Tourist Board, and are limited to 12 people. Private walking tours (29,000 or 25,000 kronor) and three- to four-hour private photo tours (35,000 kronor) also are available.

"My main objective is for people to feel like they know the city a bit better after they do my tour," Ms. Osp said. "I'm just someone who loves where they live and wants to share that love."

Reservations are available at www.tours.iheartreykjavik.net or by calling 354-854-4476.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: In Colorado, a Brewers’ Festival Toasts an Anniversary

The Colorado Brewers' Festival will celebrate its 25th anniversary this month in Fort Collins, Colo., a place where the thirst for craft beer is alive, kicking and growing. This year's festival brings 13 new breweries to the tasting tables, offering a total of close to 120 different brews, including its first group of hard ciders.

The annual All Brewer's Eve dinner and food-pairing ($60) gets things hopping on Friday night, June 27, with 20 different beers offered exclusively at the dinner, most of which have won medals at the Great American Beer Festival and World Beer Cup. That's followed by two days of drinking (or "tasting," as it's called in the industry) from a rotating list of more than 50 beers each day of the festival.

Those who want to get started early on Saturday can sign up for the first-ever festival brunch at the Mainline, an ale house and restaurant in Fort Collins ($40). Breakfast will be served with a selection of "morning-minded" beers, according to the organizers, after which participants will be led to the festival grounds by a brass band, where they will receive a commemorative glass and 10 festival bucks to spend on samples.

Also new this year will be the Colorado Brewers Guild's "beer school" and the Summit specialty brew tent, offering a series of educational seminars and meet-the-brewers opportunities, where guests can mingle with the makers.

To honor its 25th year, the festival's founders, Doug Odell of Odell Brewing and Brad Page, a founder of CooperSmith Pub and Brewery, have melded their talents to create an Anniversary Ale, a pale, dry, brew with a tart finish, they said, partly sourced from apple juice.

For the first festival, the only requirement was that participants brew beer in Colorado, Mr. Odell said on the phone from his brewery in Fort Collins. Attendees emptied around 35 half-barrels (or kegs) of beer that year, he said, compared with the estimated 540 kegs floated at last year's event.

"When we started, people thought beer was just that light American lager. It's really morphed; the growth of craft beers in Colorado is amazing," he said, noting that despite a few nonbeer ideas that organizers sneak in now and again (a chili cook-off one year and carnival rides in another), the festival has always remained a showcase for the flavors and the individuals who make them.

There will be some additional entertainment, provided by bands at the Base Camp stage, and outdoor activities like zip-lining and rock-climbing in the Wilderness area, a good opportunity for tasters to sweat out some of that malt before heading to the next tasting.

Entry is free; packages are available for tastings and special events. For details and passes, contact the Downtown Fort Collins Business Association: 970-484-6500; downtownfortcollins.com.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Soccer, Bourbon and a Very Special Farm in Missouri

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

This was a tough week to be an Englishman, as my boys limped out of the World Cup with a defeat to Uruguay. Luckily, my spirits were only temporarily dampened, thanks to the incredible encounters I've been having in the South and Midwest.

In Bardstown, Ky., which calls itself the "Bourbon Capital of the World," I consumed ample amounts of the stuff with a gentleman named Colonel Michael Masters, a man who knows his bourbon. We rode up to his historic restaurant, Chapeze House, tired and thirsty. As he instructed us in the proper technique for tasting bourbon, he shared a story about hitching a ride from the Caribbean to Great Britain on a sailboat. When I thanked him for his Southern hospitality, he replied, "In American culture, you always take care of the traveler."

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Next, we met Pastor Bob Hardison and his wife, Violet, in the small town of Sebree, Ky. For 27 years, the couple has been welcoming cyclists, more than 200 a year, into their Sanctuary Sebree Church to sleep and wash. Violet, an incredible cook, welcomed me with the most refreshingly cold glass of iced tea I have ever tasted and cooked a mean breakfast the next morning, without charge. The Hardisons believe it to be a miracle that the Lord brought the world to their doorstep. I'm not a religious man, but if the Lord did have a hand in bringing me to the Hardisons, all I can say is, "Thank you!" It is hard not to be filled with their infectious energy and love. You leave feeling filled with more than just Violet's cooking.

Then there was the great Peter K. Delaney, who had worked as a janitor for 27 years and as a postman for the last 10. At his daughter's restaurant, Delaney's, in Goreville, Ill., he sat down beside me and said hello. What was supposed to be a quick meal turned into a four-hour lunch during which we discussed politics, food, healthcare, American history, his years in the navy as a radar operator and the love of his life, his wife Dorothy. As I stepped reluctantly back into the 92-degree afternoon, knowing I had another 30 miles to ride, he reminded me that "every day is summer!"

In Cape Girardeau, Mo., we visited Family Friendly Farm, run by Matt and Rachel Fasnacht. A former chemistry teacher with a Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry, Matt is now an independent farmer raising pigs, cows and chickens. His academic background is evident in the way he approaches farming. Matt practices management intensive rotational grazing, an approach to herd management discussed in Michael Pollan's "The Omnivore's Dilemma" that leads to healthier livestock and more nutritious products. His cows, all of whom have names, followed us as we walked the pastures. As they ate different grass varieties around the 50-acre, he explained the impact each one has on their milk.

Before I left, Matt and Rachel told a great story. This past winter was hard on many of us, but it was especially hard on Matt and Rachel. As the harsh Missouri winter raged on, sales flagged because the animals weren't producing as much, and they lost a few due to storms, resulting in additional meats in their freezer. So they began asking customers, some of whom drive as much as 100 miles for their raw milk and other natural products, if they could dig a little deeper into their pockets and buy an extra chicken or a dozen eggs for a neighbor. Everyone they asked did so. One anonymous fan even sent $1,000 with a note that read "from a very grateful customer." It shows how much people who have experienced the joy of naturally raised food come to value the people who produce it.

On Sunday, we'll stop in the great flat planes of Kansas to watch the World Cup again. With England out, this time I will be wearing my U.S.A. T-shirt with pride.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A New Guide to the Grand Canyon by Wheelchair

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 20 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Wheelchair users might not think of the Grand Canyon as a place to visit comfortably, but the accessible-travel writer Candy Harrington says it can be done in "Barrier-Free Travel: The Grand Canyon for Wheelers and Slow Walkers."

The book highlights accessible trails, sites and lodging options on the north and south rims; includes access details about the Grand Canyon Railway; and provides hard-to-find access information about Grand Canyon West.

Although it is directed at travelers with mobility limitations, parents with stroller-age children may also appreciate the information on easy-to-maneuver walking paths and stair-free entrances.

Ms. Harrington also describes and photographs specific accessible rooms at the various park hotels, including the historic El Tovar and the adjacent and newer Kachina Lodge, which, she points out, is the only property in the park with an elevator.

For visitors touring by car, the guide provides directions to accessible walkways and restrooms at several popular park overlooks, and for those not wanting to drive, it includes a list of narrated bus tours equipped for wheelchairs.

For travelers who want to reach the bottom of the canyon but can't traverse the trail down to Phantom Ranch from the South Rim, Ms. Harrington shares information about the little-known 19.5-mile driving route to the bottom of the canyon, reached by traveling through land owned by the Hualapai Tribe.

A package deal is available that includes a picnic lunch, driving permit and overnight lodging at the Hualapai Lodge, where Ms. Harrington praises the accessible parking, level entrance and Room 117.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: My Town | A Retailer and Vintner Recalls Her Bohemian Hamptons Upbringing

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 19 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Joey Wölffer, 32, the founder of the mobile shopping truck the Styleliner and co-owner of Wölffer Estate Vineyard, recalls the Hamptons of her childhood as a very different place: "miles and miles of potato fields" and "a low-key vibe inspired by artists, poets and writers."

When she was 9, Wölffer's parents took her out of an Upper East Side private school and moved full-time to the 175-acre Sagaponack farm where they kept horses, a donkey named Jeffrey and a goat named Bill. "There were just a few mansions and the beaches were filled with beach shacks," she recalls. "I remember a lunch where Bianca Jagger and Peggy Siegal came in their riding clothes, and Lee Radziwill showed up, chic as can be. It was very carefree and very Bohemian. People didn't go to clubs – they had fun dinners that turned into dance parties." After school, Wölffer would tend to her horses and ride them around open land that has since been developed. Afternoons spent hunting for potato bugs turned over to grape picking in 1992, when her father started the winery and began producing what would become a Hamptons staple: Wölffer Rosé.

Last year, Wölffer and her brother Marc took over the business, and now, when she's not traveling the world hunting for accessories to stock her mobile boutique, she lives in Sag Harbor with her husband Max Rohn. Here, the true Hamptons local shares some of her favorite hometown highlights, from farm stands to restaurants, and tips and resources for tracking down the area's best antiques.

Pike Farms stand on Sagg Main Road: Peak produce
"We've always gone there. We love supporting the local community. It has the best produce and really nice owners, Jim and Jennifer Pike. It has been there since 1983. I get excited about their white peaches! They are so delicious. I mix them with blueberries, some orange juice and our 2013 rosé table wine for dessert. I always get the sunflowers too."
82 Sagg Main Street, Sagaponack, pikefarms.com

Lazypoint Variety Store: Best beachwear
"I adore her stuff. The owner Claudja Bicalho is a local girl, and a lot of these local stores are being pushed out. I love her bathing suits and I have this incredible romper that I wear to the beach and everywhere. I also love buying vintage Tracy Feith from her."
303 Main Street, Amagansett, (631) 604-2870

The Antique Shop in Bridgehampton: Cute collectibles
"They've got beautiful things — all kinds of jewelry, textiles, furniture and textiles."
2466 Main Street, Bridgehampton, (631) 537-3838

Black Swan Antiques: Vintage finds
"I come to Black Swan to shop and for ideas. Recently I scored these two repurposed vegetable crates that are now killer bedside tables and two fun mid-century modern lamps."
Showroom at 26 Main Street, Sag Harbor, blackswansouthampton.com

27east.com: The guide to yard and estate sales
"The best thing about the Hamptons is incredible yard sales and estate sales. I like to hunt myself. For local yard sales, this site has free classified ads. Also, in Sag Harbor, there are signs up on most of the telephone posts!"
27east.com

BookHampton: A local shop for good reads
"This is one of my favorite places to go. I look at everything. I'm going next week and buying books for the winery from them. I never want to see the end of local bookstores."
41 Main Street; East Hampton, (631) 324 4939, bookhampton.com

Sylvester General Store in Sag Harbor: The coffee spot
"It has the best coffee. The 'Dreamy' coffee is my favorite! I have a sweet tooth so I like it with low-fat milk and way too much brown sugar. I like Jack's in Amagansett but it's such a scene. I don't want a scene to get my coffee."
103 Main Street, Sag Harbor, (631) 725-5012, sylvesterandco.com

Tutto Il Giorno: A linguine destination — plus some other good eats
"Gabby Karan and her husband are fantastic and they are able to maintain a low-key vibe while still running the best restaurant in the Hamptons. I am totally obsessed with their linguine con vongole. I keep going back. I also dig a burger at LT Burger in Sag. Crow's Nest in Montauk is another favorite of mine. The kale salad and the fish are so good and so fresh. I have known Tora and Jeff at Sen for years. You always get fresh, delicious food and great service. They are also open year-round."
Tutto Il Giorno: 5 Bay Street, Sag Harbor, tuttoilgiorno.com. LT Burger: 62 Main Street, Sag Harbor, ltburger.com. The Crow's Nest: 4 Old West Lake Dr, Montauk, (631) 668-2077, crowsnestmtk.com.
Sen: 23 Main Street, Sag Harbor, (631) 725-1774, senrestaurant.com.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Pop-Up Restaurants on the Rails

Stars of London's restaurant scene will be periodically hopping aboard the vintage Art Deco cars of the British Pullman, one of several luxury trains operated by Belmond, the former Orient Express Hotels Group, to serve as one-night-only pop-up chefs.

On July 12, the chef Tom Kerridge will board the Pullman's dining cars to serve the food that propelled his public house, the Hand and Flowers in Marlow, England, onto the British restaurant scene in 2012 by becoming the first pub ever to receive two Michelin stars.

In October, the series continues with meals prepared by the chef Tom Sellers, whose Story in Southwark, London, made headlines last year by earning a Michelin star within five months of opening.

He will be followed by James Martin, whose presence on "Saturday Kitchen," the BBC1 television show, has made his face as familiar as the food he serves at the Talbot Malton hotel in Yorkshire and the Manchester235 Casino in Manchester.

Anton Mosimann, the Swiss chef and owner of Mosimann's private dining club in London's Belgrave Square, will do the pop-up finale in November.

Each dinner will be hosted by Pullman's own executive head chef, Robbie Gleason, who will seat around 100 guests each trip while traveling from London's Victoria station through the British countryside. Tickets, which include train fare, start at $830 and can be purchased at luxurytrainjourneys.com or by calling 800-524-2420.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Room Service, I’ll Have a Massage

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 17 Juni 2014 | 17.36

In-room massages are a standard amenity at most upscale hotels, but luxury properties are increasingly giving their guests a chance to enjoy more elaborate spa treatments en-suite. The Chatwal in New York City, for example, has a package through its Elizabeth Arden spa that includes reflexology, a warm cream manicure and a blow dry and style for women and hair trim and neck cleanup for men ($534).

Imanta Punta de Mita, a Relais & Châteaux property on Riviera Nayarit in Mexico, has a 90-minute honey and almond exfoliation followed by a massage ($200); Sugar Beach, a Viceroy Resort in St. Lucia, has a 50-minute sun soother wrap that uses aloe, lavender and oatmeal to help reduce the effects of overexposure to the sun and incorporates a 20-minute head massage ($100); and the Montage in Deer Valley, Utah, has an hourlong oxygen facial where the therapist brings the oxygenating machine into the room ($270).

Some properties offer all of their spa services in-room for an additional cost: Amanyara on Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos charges $50 extra for its more than two dozen choices, while the St. Regis Bahia Beach in Puerto Rico charges $75 for its Spa Without Walls offering, which allows guests to have a treatment at certain locations on its grounds, including in their bedrooms.

These door-to-door options don't come cheap, but according to Mia Kyrico, the chief brand officer for SpaFinder Wellness, an online service that connects consumers with spas, they benefit both guests and hotels.

"There is a huge and growing demand in travel for wellness-related services, but not everyone feels comfortable going to a public space for a treatment," she said. "Businesswise, it's smart for hotels because they can offer it without too much extra cost on their end."

A version of this article appears in print on 06/15/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Room Service, I'll Have a Massage.
17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Cruises With Unesco Sites as Destinations

The small-ship cruise line Seabourn has tied virtual mooring lines to Unesco in a new program that offers increased access to the organization's diverse World Heritage sites such as Avignon, France, the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland and Peterhof Palace in St. Petersburg.

The new partnership, announced Monday and beginning with itineraries departing on or after Aug. 1, is expected to raise $1 million over six years by charging passengers $5 to $10 extra for World Heritage tours, donations that will be earmarked for preservation.

In exchange, the cruise line gains access to World Heritage experts for its on-board speaker roster. Speakers will include experts who have undertaken Unesco World Heritage Center work, including those who established guidelines for inscription, and evaluated them as archaeologists, art and architecture historians and geologists.

On shore, Seabourn plans to offer special World Heritage Discovery Tours developed with Unesco site managers. "These will include an even more up close and personal perspective," Seabourn president Rick Meadows said in an interview.

Although many are still under development, tours may include traditional musical performances, meetings with preservationists or in the case of Dubrovnik, Croatia, a tour of the walled city with an archaeologist.
Seabourn already offers visits to roughly 150 Unesco World Heritage sites annually on its sailings. But, Mr. Meadows said, "The speakers and shore excursions will provide the opportunity to go much more in depth in exploring cultural and natural heritage sites around world."


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: Food Matters | In Fez, a Restaurant Starring the Finest Chefs in the World

Deep in the hive-like medina (old city) of Fez, Morocco, one of the world's most beautiful restaurants has just reopened as a venue for an intriguing new visiting-chef-in-residence project that casts the kitchen as an incubator for both cultural exchange and culinary innovation.

Restaurant Numero 7 is owned by Stephen di Renza, a former fashion director for Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman who divides his time between Fez and Marrakesh, where he is the creative director for the Jardin Majorelle, Yves Saint Laurent's old lair. Di Renza, who has lived in Morocco full time since 2007, originally designed the striking restaurant — which features black-and-white tile work, a black marble water wall and an installation of hand-blown glass bubbles — to complement his adjacent hotel, Riad 9. But he had to close it when its founding chef, Bruno Ussel, decided to return to France last year.

Some time later, Di Renza found himself in conversation with Tara Stevens, an English food writer who divides her time between Fez and Barcelona, and Jerome Waag, a chef at Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., about what to do with the restaurant. Together they came up with a chef-in-residence program based on the discovery of Moroccan produce and the Moroccan palate, a concept they dubbed "Beldi market cuisine," beldi being a Moroccan Arabic term used to denote something indigenous, traditional or locally produced.

Each visiting chef will be invited to create a daily menu based on seasonal produce sourced from Fez's central market or nearby farmers. After a fire at Chez Panisse cleared a space in the French-born Waag's schedule, he agreed to go first. He'll be creating daily three-course menus until June 23, when the restaurant closes for Ramadan and the rest of the summer; taking over on Sept. 1 will be Analiese Gregory, who has been cooking at Quay in Sydney and Mugaritz in Spain.

Waag's most exciting discovery in Morocco, he says, has been the country's "amped-up produce. It's so dense and intense, so I've had to rethink the way I use an herb like mint — it's so potent here." A recent menu of his included chilled fava bean and almond soup with rosemary-infused olive oil, baked sardines with pickled plums, fried sage and green beans; free-range chicken braised with fresh figs and anise seed and served with an okra and artichoke flower ragout; and camel's milk panna cotta with carob honey and plum sauce.

"Food is the fastest way to understand a culture, and cooking puts you into immediate contact with where you are," Waag says. He noticed, for instance, that Moroccans usually throw away beet greens, which he likes to braise or use in soups. "So I saw a man with a donkey loaded up with beet greens that he was taking away to be thrown out, and I stopped him and said I wanted to buy them. He thought I was joking, and said I could have all of them for two dirhams — roughly 25 cents. I told him I was serious, and he asked me what I was going to do with them. I said, 'cook them and eat them,' and he laughed. But I'd be surprised if he didn't start wondering what they'd taste like if he cooked some himself."

‪7 Zkak Rouan, Fez, Morocco. Open until June 23 and after Sept. 1 for dinner only; reservations advised. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, visit restaurantnumero7.com.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Greenmarkets and Off-the-Grid Living in the Heart of Kentucky Coal Country

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 16 Juni 2014 | 17.36

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

"Son, you're in the heart of coal country," said the retired coal miner as we pulled into a gas station in the town of McKee in Eastern Kentucky. "We can fix just about anything here."

Ten minutes later, Jasper, a.k.a. Junior, age 70, returned with a pack of cigarettes in one hand and a wrench in the other. Within five minutes he had fixed a bent bicycle wheel and we were back on the road.

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Sadly, Jasper and his fellow Kentuckians' talent for fixing anything does not extend to a good, nutritious meal. In fact, in this corner of the world, it feels that food has not been part of the conversation for a long, long time. After four days, 300 miles, four Subway lunches, two Dairy Queen dinners and an order of deep-fried Oreos as an afternoon snack, I was beginning to think that the idea of this ride was somewhat hopeless.

Then, miraculously, we pulled into the town of Berea, home to a liberal-arts college of 1,600 students, all of whom work at the school in exchange for free tuition.

After a little research, I made my way down to the farm that serves the college cafeteria and spent the morning talking and touring the grounds with three students working there. All three had something in common: their fathers had diabetes, the direct result of poor diets. After all I had seen in Eastern Kentucky during the days before, it was refreshing to hear these kids speak with passion about food and healthy eating, convinced that their generation would be healthier than the one before through an awareness of good food. They had seen firsthand the financial burden of living with diabetes, which, they'd come to realize, is far more expensive than fresh produce.

From there, I walked down to the town's greenmarket, where I found a wonderful community of farmers and artisans. Faye and her husband are farm apprentices, Sarah is working in community gardens around the Appalachians and Corrie is putting on an event combining food and theater. These folks stick out like sore thumbs in the area because they are doing something so fundamentally different. They are the odd ones, but after six days in Kentucky it struck me that they were the happier ones.

Perhaps the most unusual members of the community are Liam and Valentina, who sell their home-baked bread at the market. They invited us to stop by for lunch on our way out of town the next day. The couple met in Sicily and bicycled through Europe to Ukraine. Part of what impressed us about them is that they only use bikes to get around, and live fully off the grid.

When we arrived, Valentina was washing dishes in the creek and Liam was concluding his morning coffee ritual, which includes roasting the beans in his homemade wood-fired oven. Lunch was a mixture of veggies that Valentina pulled from the garden. "We don't go to restaurant, restaurant come to us," she said in her thick Ukrainian accent as she tossed them my way. I cooked sweet potato, Swiss chard and green onion stew over the oven, discussing the pros and cons of radical simplicity. It was certainly not the conversation I expected to have on my way out of Kentucky. But that's the joy of travel: a day never quite works out the way you'd planned it.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A Vieques Hotel With Contemporary Design–and Cuisine

The small island of Vieques, just off the eastern coast of Puerto Rico, will soon harbor one of the most architecturally significant hotels in the Caribbean.

El Blok, a 22-room inn designed by the award-winning local firm Fuster + Architects, opens next month in Esperanza, Vieques' main seaside village.

With a round-edged concrete exterior punctuated by sculptural lattice work, the Gold LEED-certified building offers a contemporary take on the Tropical Modernist style that became popular in San Juan in the 1950's.

"We wanted to celebrate Puerto Rico's postwar modernist architecture and simultaneously fit into the curved corner property," said Simon Baeyertz, a New Zealand-born former music industry executive and a co-owner.

Inside, walls were finished in polished plaster and floors covered in hydraulic tiles in solid bright colors.

Most of the furnishings were made locally, including a long bar counter crafted from a single almond tree and '60s-style chairs built with reclaimed mahogany.

There are playful details as well, such as concrete beach balls in the balconies of every room. Amenities include Magniflex organic mattresses, memory foam pillows and high-thread-count cotton linen.

A pool with panoramic ocean and forest views occupies the rooftop terrace.

But perhaps the hotel's most anticipated feature has been its lobby restaurant and bar, called Placita. José Enrique, a young chef whose innovative take on traditional Puerto Rican cuisine earned him a James Beard Award nomination last year, will serve fresh, simple dishes with Creole influences in the 3,000-square-foot dining space.

An early version of Placita's menu has several seafood appetizers like ceviche and tiradito, plus a tropical version of the Scotch egg, made with longaniza sausage. Roasted chicken with ají ragout, and flank steak with Creole panzanella salad are among the entrees.

Rates for double rooms start at $175.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Room Service, I’ll Have a Massage

In-room massages are a standard amenity at most upscale hotels, but luxury properties are increasingly giving their guests a chance to enjoy more elaborate spa treatments en-suite. The Chatwal in New York City, for example, has a package through its Elizabeth Arden spa that includes reflexology, a warm cream manicure and a blow dry and style for women and hair trim and neck cleanup for men ($534).

Imanta Punta de Mita, a Relais & Châteaux property on Riviera Nayarit in Mexico, has a 90-minute honey and almond exfoliation followed by a massage ($200); Sugar Beach, a Viceroy Resort in St. Lucia, has a 50-minute sun soother wrap that uses aloe, lavender and oatmeal to help reduce the effects of overexposure to the sun and incorporates a 20-minute head massage ($100); and the Montage in Deer Valley, Utah, has an hourlong oxygen facial where the therapist brings the oxygenating machine into the room ($270).

Some properties offer all of their spa services in-room for an additional cost: Amanyara on Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos charges $50 extra for its more than two dozen choices, while the St. Regis Bahia Beach in Puerto Rico charges $75 for its Spa Without Walls offering, which allows guests to have a treatment at certain locations on its grounds, including in their bedrooms.

These door-to-door options don't come cheap, but according to Mia Kyrico, the chief brand officer for SpaFinder Wellness, an online service that connects consumers with spas, they benefit both guests and hotels.

"There is a huge and growing demand in travel for wellness-related services, but not everyone feels comfortable going to a public space for a treatment," she said. "Businesswise, it's smart for hotels because they can offer it without too much extra cost on their end."

A version of this article appears in print on 06/15/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Room Service, I'll Have a Massage.
17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Greenmarkets and Off-the-Grid Living in the Heart of Kentucky Coal Country

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 15 Juni 2014 | 17.36

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

"Son, you're in the heart of coal country," said the retired coal miner as we pulled into a gas station in the town of McKee in Eastern Kentucky. "We can fix just about anything here."

Ten minutes later, Jasper, a.k.a. Junior, age 70, returned with a pack of cigarettes in one hand and a wrench in the other. Within five minutes he had fixed a bent bicycle wheel and we were back on the road.

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Sadly, Jasper and his fellow Kentuckians' talent for fixing anything does not extend to a good, nutritious meal. In fact, in this corner of the world, it feels that food has not been part of the conversation for a long, long time. After four days, 300 miles, four Subway lunches, two Dairy Queen dinners and an order of deep-fried Oreos as an afternoon snack, I was beginning to think that the idea of this ride was somewhat hopeless.

Then, miraculously, we pulled into the town of Berea, home to a liberal-arts college of 1,600 students, all of whom work at the school in exchange for free tuition.

After a little research, I made my way down to the farm that serves the college cafeteria and spent the morning talking and touring the grounds with three students working there. All three had something in common: their fathers had diabetes, the direct result of poor diets. After all I had seen in Eastern Kentucky during the days before, it was refreshing to hear these kids speak with passion about food and healthy eating, convinced that their generation would be healthier than the one before through an awareness of good food. They had seen firsthand the financial burden of living with diabetes, which, they'd come to realize, is far more expensive than fresh produce.

From there, I walked down to the town's greenmarket, where I found a wonderful community of farmers and artisans. Faye and her husband are farm apprentices, Sarah is working in community gardens around the Appalachians and Corrie is putting on an event combining food and theater. These folks stick out like sore thumbs in the area because they are doing something so fundamentally different. They are the odd ones, but after six days in Kentucky it struck me that they were the happier ones.

Perhaps the most unusual members of the community are Liam and Valentina, who sell their home-baked bread at the market. They invited us to stop by for lunch on our way out of town the next day. The couple met in Sicily and bicycled through Europe to Ukraine. Part of what impressed us about them is that they only use bikes to get around, and live fully off the grid.

When we arrived, Valentina was washing dishes in the creek and Liam was concluding his morning coffee ritual, which includes roasting the beans in his homemade wood-fired oven. Lunch was a mixture of veggies that Valentina pulled from the garden. "We don't go to restaurant, restaurant come to us," she said in her thick Ukrainian accent as she tossed them my way. I cooked sweet potato, Swiss chard and green onion stew over the oven, discussing the pros and cons of radical simplicity. It was certainly not the conversation I expected to have on my way out of Kentucky. But that's the joy of travel: a day never quite works out the way you'd planned it.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A Vieques Hotel With Contemporary Design–and Cuisine

The small island of Vieques, just off the eastern coast of Puerto Rico, will soon harbor one of the most architecturally significant hotels in the Caribbean.

El Blok, a 22-room inn designed by the award-winning local firm Fuster + Architects, opens next month in Esperanza, Vieques' main seaside village.

With a round-edged concrete exterior punctuated by sculptural lattice work, the Gold LEED-certified building offers a contemporary take on the Tropical Modernist style that became popular in San Juan in the 1950's.

"We wanted to celebrate Puerto Rico's postwar modernist architecture and simultaneously fit into the curved corner property," said Simon Baeyertz, a New Zealand-born former music industry executive and a co-owner.

Inside, walls were finished in polished plaster and floors covered in hydraulic tiles in solid bright colors.

Most of the furnishings were made locally, including a long bar counter crafted from a single almond tree and '60s-style chairs built with reclaimed mahogany.

There are playful details as well, such as concrete beach balls in the balconies of every room. Amenities include Magniflex organic mattresses, memory foam pillows and high-thread-count cotton linen.

A pool with panoramic ocean and forest views occupies the rooftop terrace.

But perhaps the hotel's most anticipated feature has been its lobby restaurant and bar, called Placita. José Enrique, a young chef whose innovative take on traditional Puerto Rican cuisine earned him a James Beard Award nomination last year, will serve fresh, simple dishes with Creole influences in the 3,000-square-foot dining space.

An early version of Placita's menu has several seafood appetizers like ceviche and tiradito, plus a tropical version of the Scotch egg, made with longaniza sausage. Roasted chicken with ají ragout, and flank steak with Creole panzanella salad are among the entrees.

Rates for double rooms start at $175.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Room Service, I’ll Have a Massage

In-room massages are a standard amenity at most upscale hotels, but luxury properties are increasingly giving their guests a chance to enjoy more elaborate spa treatments en-suite. The Chatwal in New York City, for example, has a package through its Elizabeth Arden spa that includes reflexology, a warm cream manicure and a blow dry and style for women and hair trim and neck cleanup for men ($534).

Imanta Punta de Mita, a Relais & Châteaux property on Riviera Nayarit in Mexico, has a 90-minute honey and almond exfoliation followed by a massage ($200); Sugar Beach, a Viceroy Resort in St. Lucia, has a 50-minute sun soother wrap that uses aloe, lavender and oatmeal to help reduce the effects of overexposure to the sun and incorporates a 20-minute head massage ($100); and the Montage in Deer Valley, Utah, has an hourlong oxygen facial where the therapist brings the oxygenating machine into the room ($270).

Some properties offer all of their spa services in-room for an additional cost: Amanyara on Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos charges $50 extra for its more than two dozen choices, while the St. Regis Bahia Beach in Puerto Rico charges $75 for its Spa Without Walls offering, which allows guests to have a treatment at certain locations on its grounds, including in their bedrooms.

These door-to-door options don't come cheap, but according to Mia Kyrico, the chief brand officer for SpaFinder Wellness, an online service that connects consumers with spas, they benefit both guests and hotels.

"There is a huge and growing demand in travel for wellness-related services, but not everyone feels comfortable going to a public space for a treatment," she said. "Businesswise, it's smart for hotels because they can offer it without too much extra cost on their end."

A version of this article appears in print on 06/15/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Room Service, I'll Have a Massage.
17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: A Vieques Hotel With Contemporary Design–and Cuisine

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 14 Juni 2014 | 17.35

The small island of Vieques, just off the eastern coast of Puerto Rico, will soon harbor one of the most architecturally significant hotels in the Caribbean.

El Blok, a 22-room inn designed by the award-winning local firm Fuster + Architects, opens next month in Esperanza, Vieques' main seaside village.

With a round-edged concrete exterior punctuated by sculptural lattice work, the Gold LEED-certified building offers a contemporary take on the Tropical Modernist style that became popular in San Juan in the 1950's.

"We wanted to celebrate Puerto Rico's postwar modernist architecture and simultaneously fit into the curved corner property," said Simon Baeyertz, a New Zealand-born former music industry executive and a co-owner.

Inside, walls were finished in polished plaster and floors covered in hydraulic tiles in solid bright colors.

Most of the furnishings were made locally, including a long bar counter crafted from a single almond tree and '60s-style chairs built with reclaimed mahogany.

There are playful details as well, such as concrete beach balls in the balconies of every room. Amenities include Magniflex organic mattresses, memory foam pillows and high-thread-count cotton linen.

A pool with panoramic ocean and forest views occupies the rooftop terrace.

But perhaps the hotel's most anticipated feature has been its lobby restaurant and bar, called Placita. José Enrique, a young chef whose innovative take on traditional Puerto Rican cuisine earned him a James Beard Award nomination last year, will serve fresh, simple dishes with Creole influences in the 3,000-square-foot dining space.

An early version of Placita's menu has several seafood appetizers like ceviche and tiradito, plus a tropical version of the Scotch egg, made with longaniza sausage. Roasted chicken with ají ragout, and flank steak with Creole panzanella salad are among the entrees.

Rates for double rooms start at $175.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: A Ride Across America | Greenmarkets and Off-the-Grid Living in the Heart of Kentucky Coal Country

Over the course of eight weeks, Ben Towill, the co-owner of the Fat Radish, and the photographer Patrick Dougherty are biking 4,500 miles across the U.S. to talk to strangers about food. Each week, they'll file a dispatch for T about their discoveries.

"Son, you're in the heart of coal country," said the retired coal miner as we pulled into a gas station in the town of McKee in Eastern Kentucky. "We can fix just about anything here."

Ten minutes later, Jasper, a.k.a. Junior, age 70, returned with a pack of cigarettes in one hand and a wrench in the other. Within five minutes he had fixed a bent bicycle wheel and we were back on the road.

SERIES
A Ride Across America

Read more of Ben Towill's weekly dispatches about food and how we eat it, filed as he bikes across the country. More…

Sadly, Jasper and his fellow Kentuckians' talent for fixing anything does not extend to a good, nutritious meal. In fact, in this corner of the world, it feels that food has not been part of the conversation for a long, long time. After four days, 300 miles, four Subway lunches, two Dairy Queen dinners and an order of deep-fried Oreos as an afternoon snack, I was beginning to think that the idea of this ride was somewhat hopeless.

Then, miraculously, we pulled into the town of Berea, home to a liberal-arts college of 1,600 students, all of whom work at the school in exchange for free tuition.

After a little research, I made my way down to the farm that serves the college cafeteria and spent the morning talking and touring the grounds with three students working there. All three had something in common: their fathers had diabetes, the direct result of poor diets. After all I had seen in Eastern Kentucky during the days before, it was refreshing to hear these kids speak with passion about food and healthy eating, convinced that their generation would be healthier than the one before through an awareness of good food. They had seen firsthand the financial burden of living with diabetes, which, they'd come to realize, is far more expensive than fresh produce.

From there, I walked down to the town's greenmarket, where I found a wonderful community of farmers and artisans. Faye and her husband are farm apprentices, Sarah is working in community gardens around the Appalachians and Corrie is putting on an event combining food and theater. These folks stick out like sore thumbs in the area because they are doing something so fundamentally different. They are the odd ones, but after six days in Kentucky it struck me that they were the happier ones.

Perhaps the most unusual members of the community are Liam and Valentina, who sell their home-baked bread at the market. They invited us to stop by for lunch on our way out of town the next day. The couple met in Sicily and bicycled through Europe to Ukraine. Part of what impressed us about them is that they only use bikes to get around, and live fully off the grid.

When we arrived, Valentina was washing dishes in the creek and Liam was concluding his morning coffee ritual, which includes roasting the beans in his homemade wood-fired oven. Lunch was a mixture of veggies that Valentina pulled from the garden. "We don't go to restaurant, restaurant come to us," she said in her thick Ukrainian accent as she tossed them my way. I cooked sweet potato, Swiss chard and green onion stew over the oven, discussing the pros and cons of radical simplicity. It was certainly not the conversation I expected to have on my way out of Kentucky. But that's the joy of travel: a day never quite works out the way you'd planned it.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: New Flights to Colombia

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 13 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Two airlines have announced plans to add flights to Cartagena this year, reflecting the growth in American tourism demand in Colombia.

Beginning July 17, Avianca will offer direct flights from Kennedy Airport in New York to Cartagena three times weekly, Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays, with continuing service to Pereira, gateway to coffee country. Returning flights will operate Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

JetBlue Airways will begin flying nonstop between Fort Lauderdale and Cartagena four times per week, Wednesdays through Saturdays, beginning Oct. 29.

As the country's reputation for crime and drugs has receded somewhat, tourism in Colombia has grown consistently, with 3.7 million foreign travelers in 2013, up over 7 percent from the year prior, according to the government tourism agency. Of those, American travelers represent the largest contingent at 336,454, up 5.4 percent in 2013.

In 2013, the Open Skies agreement between the two countries freed airlines from government regulation to pursue foreign routes. Since then, tourism authorities have aggressively pursued American travelers with an advertising campaign touting "Colombia, Magical Realism," turning a literary tradition embodied by the late Colombian novelist Gabriel García Marquez into an experiential travel proposition.
"Beyond sightseeing, people now are looking for unique experiences," said Claudia Davila, United States director of tourism for Proexport Colombia, the government agency in charge of tourism promotion. For the agency, the magic is grounded in natural wonder. "You can have beaches anywhere. We have beaches filled with turtles."


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: Now Screening | Travels With Agnès Varda

The French filmmaker Agnès Varda visits with Chris Marker at his home.

In her new five-part travel series "From Here to There" (available through SundanceNOW's subscription program, Doc Club), the French filmmaker Agnès Varda, now 86, sometimes referred to as "The Grandmother of New Wave," attends art and film festivals, visits old friends, interviews favorite artists and makes new acquaintances. Most of the time, a camera is in her hand. Occasionally, someone else is filming and she enters the scene. Whether in front of the lens or behind it, her curiosity is boundless and rooted in a desire to share her friendships and pleasures. "The main subject is 'the other,'" she says. "I'm present in my films, I'm among the others."

Varda, who was married to the French New Wave filmmaker Jacques Demy, made her first feature, "La Pointe Courte," in 1954. Working in the small fishing town of Sète, she recruited locals and two professional Parisian actors, contrasting and comparing their different realities with fictional stories. Later work, like "Cléo from 5 to 7," "Vagabond" and "Daguerréotypes," similarly married poetic and documentary impulses. Her most recent film, 2008's "The Beaches of Agnès," an autobiographical stroll through her memories as she celebrates her 80th birthday, is a precursor to this latest series of vignettes, many of which she filmed during her publicity tour.

"Thanks to life, I'm continuously allowing new thoughts to replace others," Varda explains. "It's like a river. It flows nonstop." That's the feeling the vignettes create. She goes to see her camera-shy friend Chris Marker, the director, most famously, of "La Jetée." We don't see him, but we see his gloriously messy studio, and he introduces her to his hobby, the online virtual world "Second Life." She travels to Nantes for a celebration of the 20th anniversary of her husband's death; there, she sees Anouk Aimée, the star of Demy's 1961 film "Lola," which was shot there, along with her children, Mathieu and Rosalie. In Portugal, her friend Manoel de Oliveira dances for her, after she discusses his magical-realist film, "The Strange Case of Angelica." In Stockholm, a bald female journalist enters the room to interview her, and immediately, Varda asks if she has been ill, pulling us into the woman's world. In St. Petersburg, she considers the young press photographer sent to take her portrait, noting that he has the face of a dreamer. She travels to Sète, chats with the old fisherman who starred in her first film, and visits the artist Pierre Soulages at his beach home. In Mexico, she visits Frida Kahlo's house and talks to the filmmaker Carlos Reygadas.

Throughout, Varda also offers glimpses of her own art: recent installations at museums and biennales, retrospectives of her films, new photography projects. And she has always inserted herself into art that she finds compelling; she reveals an old self-portrait she took in the Venice Accademia and stands with the wise men in the painting "Miracle of the Cross at the Bridge of S. Lorenzo" by the Renaissance artist Gentile Bellini, as if she were one of them.

"Another level of truth appears in the representation of life," she says. "Another level of showing off as well."

"From Here to There" is available now through SundanceNOW's Doc Club as part of the series "Agnès Varda and Personal Cinema," docclub.com.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: In Nature | The Gardener of Versailles

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 12 Juni 2014 | 17.35

André Le Nôtre's 17th-century masterpiece for Louis XIV has not been altered for centuries — until now. The renowned yet humble French landscape designer Louis Benech is reimagining the four-acre Water Theater, the Sun King's favorite grove.

There is no garden in the world more splendid and extravagant than that of Versailles. Designed by the French landscaper André Le Nôtre in 1661 for King Louis XIV, the nearly 2,000-acre park is a sharply architectural expanse of perspectives, parterres, fountains and groves that since its inception has defined what a French garden should be. It took 40 years to complete, and its design continued to evolve through the 19th century, when the palace first opened as a museum. Since then, the garden of Versailles has been an endeavor of maintenance and restoration, but not of creation.

The landscape architect Louis Benech and the artist Jean-Michel Othoniel discuss the inspiration for their redesign of the Water Theater at Versailles and how trees have memories.

That will change in the fall with the reopening of the new Water Theater grove, a long-dormant bosquet — a group of trees planted in an orderly arrangement — that once served as the king's outdoor stage and has been brought back to life by the renowned French landscape designer Louis Benech, along with the artist Jean-Michel Othoniel. This immense project — hundreds of trees and shrubs, pools and whimsical golden fountains on four acres — is the first new construction in Versailles's garden in centuries. "I have tried to nourish this grove in a contemporary way, the same way Le Nôtre did, and to stay very Versailles and Louis XIV," Benech says. At the same time, he points out, "There is no more king. This bosquet is for the people" — meaning the six million tourists who visit Versailles annually — "and it will be open every day of the year."

The magic of Versailles's garden is how it unfurls bit by bit. "From the first steps, you don't see that there is a fountain below. It's only when you reach the edge of the terrace that you realize that it's there," Benech explains. "Then you see these three sections of white, green and blue" — the paths, the lawns and the canal — "and you start to dream. Because of the slope of the grass, you feel the water is going up to the sky. You have to let yourself be penetrated by the place."

Its greatest mysteries were a series of 15 square-hedge enclosed bosquets (pronounced "boss-kay"), each with a different theme and role. The most elaborate was le bosquet du Théâtre d'Eau, or Water Theater grove, with three alleys, fountains, sculptures of the gods Mars, Jupiter and Pluto as children, three tiers of grass-covered seats and a stage. Though the king was involved with the design of the entire garden, as a lover of the performing arts — ballet as we know it today was born at Versailles — he was particularly partial to the Water Theater.

Sadly, after Louis XIV's reign, the Water Theater was neglected, and in 1775, Louis XVI had it torn out and replaced with a simpler lawn known as the Round Green grove. In the 1990s, it was badly damaged by two major storms, and has since served as a parking and storage area.

In 2011, Versailles launched an international competition to select the landscaper to redesign the grove — an honor which, not surprisingly, was awarded to Benech. Benech has been France's landscape designer of choice since 1990, when he won the competition to restore the Tuileries. Since then, the 57-year-old Frenchman who humbly refers to himself as "a gardener" has done the gardens for France's presidential residence, foreign ministry and National Archives as well as for the homes of the French tycoon François Pinault, members of the de Rothschild family and his own partner, Christian Louboutin.

For this project, Benech changed his approach. "Usually I am a visual designer: I see what is working and not working and come up with solutions," he says. "But this was such an immense assignment, with so much history, I decided to be more conceptual." Benech studied Le Nôtre's Versailles plans and saw that for his layout and plantings he had used multiples of the number three — "like the Holy Trinity," the designer says — since Louis XIV was a ruler of divine right. In the gardener's plan, Benech stuck close to this conceptual rule: There are three alleys and three round pools, 18 Irish yews, 90 live oaks. "I didn't want to be exactly like Le Nôtre," Benech says, "but there was a certain esotericism in what he did that I wanted to respect." He also liked that Le Nôtre collaborated with artists to bring another dimension to the design.

He thought of Jean-Michel Othoniel, a French artist who creates sculptures with grapefruit-size colored Murano glass beads and is best known for his joyful Métro entrance at the Palais Royal in Paris. Benech went to see an Othoniel exhibition at the Pompidou Center and noted that children responded to it. This was important, he says, since Le Nôtre had created the Water Theater grove on the theme of childhood, and Benech wanted his design to appeal to all.

In Othoniel's own research, he found that the king loved to dance — so much so that he had the choreographer Raoul-Auger Feuillet come up with a sort of written shorthand instruction of baroque dances, published as the book "L'Art de Décrire la Danse" in 1701. Othoniel tracked down a copy at the Boston Public Library. Charmed by the swirling movement of the script — what he calls "filigree calligraphy" — he decided to use that as the basis of his sculptures. "It was a modern way to talk about Louis XIV," Othoniel says.

For the work, titled "Les Belles Danses," Othoniel excerpted three dances and recreated them in large glass beads of gold — another reference to the Sun King — strung together in happy swoops that conclude with shooting jets of water. Othoniel believes the new Water Theater grove is "an optimistic view of gardens. Instead of being nostalgic, we are going forward, thinking modern . . . yet there's a notion of transmission — that we can cross centuries and have confidence in our voice to pass on ideas from generation to generation." Just like Le Nôtre.

A version of this article appears in print on 06/15/2014, on page M276 of the NewYork edition with the headline: The Gardener of Versailles.

17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Hotels Get in the World Cup Spirit

A number of United States hotels are offering themed packages to coincide with the FIFA World Cup, held in Brazil from June 12 to July 13 this year.

W South Beach in Miami Beach offers a "Timeout Getaway" through a partnership with the James Beard Award-winning chef Andrew Carmellini, with a "Create-Your-Own Caipirinha Kit" amenity in rooms, churrasco-style dishes and two World Cup-themed cocktails served daily. Rates start at $489.

JW Marriott in Las Vegas has a Brazilian Package that includes dinner for two at Steakhouse Night on Wednesdays, a treatment at the hotel's spa and a dining credit; rates start at $139.

The Clevelander Hotel Miami Beach's "Stay and Cheer" packages start at $279 and include a standard room, two signature frozen cocktails on check-in, souvenir T-shirts, a bucket of Bud Light and preferred seating at World Cup viewing parties.

Hyatt Union Square in New York will create a World Cup pop-up restaurant called Botequim.

Airlines too are into the soccer spirit: American Airlines is offering visitors traveling to and from Brazil the option of 48-hour layovers in gateway cities at no additional cost during the World Cup only (according to The Miami Herald, Miami will most likely be the major hub for World Cup traffic outside Brazil).

"The World Cup has a particular kind of power, and if you're thinking of the midsummer as a sort of slow time for events, this is a way for hotels to latch on to this power," Bob Boland, professor of sports management at New York University's Tisch Center, said in a telephone interview.

Mr. Boland said that he doesn't necessarily think these packages reflect a great love of the sport of soccer in the United States, "but they attract a young and generally well-heeled crowd."


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: Travel Diary | The World According to Renzo

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 10 Juni 2014 | 17.35

Paris is for lovers and New York for dreamers, but when you're a classy canine accustomed to life's finer things, getting there can be for the dogs.

Summer. So begins, once again, my annual pilgrimage to Europe — and the compulsory crash diet. Any more than 14 pounds and it's off to the cargo hold for me. Alas, how many times must I be humiliated by a ticket counter ogress over my alleged extra weight?

Perhaps a bit of back story would help. My name is Renzo and I hail from an illustrious Boston lineage, although they tell me that my great-grandmother ran off with a canine from rural Arkansas. One of my earliest memories is of a flight to Los Angeles to meet my new papa for the first time. We met, as happens nowadays, on the Internet, where he vied for my attention before the tête–à–tête that changed everything. Modern love.

Thanks to him, I am now a frequent flyer, and frankly, more civilized than most. I don't snore. I don't cry. And I certainly don't accost the attendants simply because I need another mini-bottle of mediocre merlot. Naturally, I am grateful to the hostesses at Air France and gentlemen at JetBlue who allow me to travel in the main cabin, neatly tucked under my papa's feet or sometimes, undetected, under a simple shawl while dreaming of filet mignon. Especially since so many airlines treat me like, well, a common canine. (You know who you are, British Airways and Air New Zealand. Here's looking at you, Emirates.) Can you imagine the gall they must have to ask me to suffer in that glorified jail cell they call "the hold," with, mon dieu, les bagages?

Accommodation is also a concern. I understand that "animal hotels" are practical, but I'd almost rather take my chances on a cot in a hostel. Human hotels simply have so much more space — and a feathered pillow or two. I like to have free rein to run up and down the carpeted corridors.

I've been invited to stay a week this fall at Le Meurice in Paris, where I expect to be pampered with special menus and walks through the Tuileries. Paris, oh Paris, how I love thee — my breakfasts, the tiny pieces of warm croissant at Café de Flore. Cannes, I dream of your film festival: the Promenade de la Croisette, with all its stars and ex-stars, my natural tuxedo on the red carpet. A few summers ago, we went to Vienna and stayed at the impossibly chic Hotel Imperial. It was so Stefan Zweig, so me. President Clinton, who had a suite across the hall, gave me a little caramelized carrot. What a sweetheart he is! But my favorite trip? The Nile, where I linger on the cool, silvery waters of the river in a simple felucca, listening to the birds, the cicadas and the distant hum of the muezzin's evening call to prayer.

I have traveled every possible way — by Vespa, helicopter, private plane and donkey. By rickshaw, yacht and canoe. By speedboat in Spetses and motoscafo in Venice. I have ridden the Tube, the train and the bus, and never have I been charged for a ticket. And yet, despite the exorbitant cost of flying, nary an airline will give me so much as a frequent flyer number. Throw me a bone, darlings. Or at least a rewards card.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Gay Pride Promotions

Companies such as Hilton, Kimpton and American Airlines have long marketed to the gay community. This month in a most public display of affection, Marriott International, a company with conservative Mormon roots, is wrapping three of its Washington, D.C., hotels in photo banners, including Jason Collins, the N.B.A.'s first openly gay basketball player, and Geena Rocero, a transgender model. The campaign urges travelers to share photos on Instagram under #LoveTravels @MarriottIntl.

In an email, Karin Timpone, global marketing officer for Marriott, described the campaign as "a universal, multicultural theme that appeals to communities throughout the world, resonating with consumers around the globe and especially with millennials and next-generation travelers who value inclusiveness."

The campaign comes during what President Obama has recently declared as L.G.B.T. pride month, which is now observed not just with parades and parties, but also with travel promotions aimed at the growing gay travel market.

Philadelphia newly advertises to the community with the social media slogan, "Brotherly, or sisterly, love is love."

With the recent passage of same-sex marriage laws in a number of states, destinations and hoteliers are increasingly welcoming gay and lesbian couples, honeymooners and celebrants.

In Chicago, the Hotel Allegro, across the street from City Hall, says it has seen an increase in post-ceremony restaurant business and plans to offer reception packages. Across town, the Hotel Lincoln offers marriage services by the assistant manager, also an ordained minister.

This month, Travel Portland in Oregon is updating its L.G.B.T. resources web page with information on wedding sites, photographers and florists.

"We have found that gay travelers do want to support gay-friendly destinations," said John Tanzella, president of the International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association, based in Florida.

The impact could be sizable. NYC & Company, New York City's marketing and tourism organization, kicked off its "NYC I Do" campaign immediately following the passage of the Marriage Equality Act in 2011, and traced $259 million in spending to it in the next year.

A version of this article appears in print on 06/08/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Gay Pride Promotions.
17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More
techieblogger.com Techie Blogger Techie Blogger